Skip to main content

Now, the Feds don't like me!

Well, while piracy is gaining a foothold of respect in the media, the government has officially listed 'right-wing extremists' as a threat. Here's a link to a prominent blogger, and her article has a link to the downloadable report. Why link a blogger? Because the media won't report this yet. It took over a week for any media, liberal or conservative, to report on the MIAC report that labeled me a domestic terrorist. It will take some time for the media to report this too.

What are some of the marks of right-wing extremists? Well, copied and pasted from the report are these marks:

Rightwing extremism in the United States can be broadly divided into those groups, movements, and adherents that are primarily hate-oriented (based on hatred of particular religious, racial or ethnic groups), and those that are mainly antigovernment, rejecting federal authority in favor of state or local authority, or rejecting government authority entirely. It may include groups and individuals that are dedicated to a single issue, such as opposition to abortion or immigration.

Ok, hate-orientation is bad, but hate is an emotion, a thought---something you can't prove/disprove. I'm all for not seeing a resurgence in the Klan, but I'm not a big fan of the Black Panthers or the Nation of Islam either.

Where's the danger? read the last line: It may include groups and individuals that are dedicated to a single issue, such as opposition to abortion or immigration. Ok, I'm opposed to abortion. And who is opposed to immigration? I'm opposed to illegal immigration. I don't think you'll solve that problem without an amnesty program, but I'm still opposed to it. And is this report alleging that people who want Americans to have the jobs in America to be a threat to national security?

And how about rejecting federal authority in favor of state or local authority? Uh-oh. Texas Governor Rick Perry is a dangerous right-wing extremist.

There's more gems to found in this mine:

During the 1990s, rightwing extremist hostility toward government
was fueled by the implementation of restrictive gun laws—such as the Brady Law
that established a 5-day waiting period prior to purchasing a handgun and the
1994 Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act that limited the sale of
various types of assault rifles—and federal law enforcement’s handling of the
confrontations at Waco, Texas and Ruby Ridge, Idaho.

So, if you thought that a now-expired law was a bad idea, that burning down a building with women and children in it, that shooting an unarmed woman that's holding a baby is excessive force, you're an extremist.

And I'll close with this one: (although, you can email me, and I'll email you the PDF of the document, so you can see it all)

Rightwing extremists were concerned during the 1990s with the perception
that illegal immigrants were taking away American jobs through their willingness to
work at significantly lower wages. They also opposed free trade agreements, arguing that
these arrangements resulted in Americans losing jobs to countries such as Mexico.

That's right! If you opposed NAFTA, you are a dangerous, right-wing extremist! Better watch out for this guy:

  1. Well, I don't think NAFTA has been good for America - and I never have.
  2. One million jobs have been lost because of NAFTA, including nearly 50,000 jobs here in Ohio.
  3. But what I refuse to accept is that we have to stand idly by while workers watch their jobs get shipped overseas.
Who is this dangerous right-winger? Well, he made a speech in Lorain, Ohio, on February 24, 2008. The full text is linked here. Mr. President, I've got to warn you: The Department of Homeland Security finds you to be a dangerous, right-wing extremist. They'll probably have people watching you, day and night.

Of course, we're getting used to that, aren't we? You've probably already got my Blackberry PIN. Message me sometime, Mr. President, and we'll figure out a way out of this mess. Bear with me though, I've got a Pearl, so I have to type slower...

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Book Review: The Heart Mender by @andyandrews (Andy Andrews)

The Heart Mender: A Story of Second ChancesEver read a book that you just kind of wish is true?  That's my take on The Heart Mender by Andy Andrews.  It's a charming story of love and forgiveness, and it's woven into the historical setting of World War II America.  For the narrative alone, the book is worth the read, but the message it contains is well worth absorbing as well.However, let's drop back a minute.  This book was originally published under the title Island of Saints.  I read Island of Saints and enjoyed it greatly.  Now, Andrews has released it under a new title, with a few minor changes.  All of this is explained in the Author's Note at the beginning, but should be noted for purchaser's sake.  If you read Island of Saints, you're rereading when you read The Heart Mender.  Now, go ahead and reread it.  It will not hurt you one bit.Overall, the story is well-paced.  There are points where I'd like more detail, both in the history and the geog…

Curiosity and the Faithlife Study Bible

Good morning! Today I want to take a look at the NIV Faithlife Study Bible. Rather than spend the whole post on this particular Study Bible, I’m going to hit a couple of highlights and then draw you through a few questions that I think this format helps with.



First, the basics of the NIV Faithlife Study Bible (NIVFSB, please): the translation is the 2011 New International Version from Biblica. I’m not the biggest fan of that translation, but that’s for another day. It is a translation rather than a paraphrase, which is important for studying the Bible. Next, the NIVFSB is printed in color. Why does that matter? This version developed with Logos Bible Software’s technology and much of the “study” matter is transitioning from screen to typeface. The graphics, maps, timelines, and more work best with color. Finally, you’ve got the typical “below-the-line” running notes on the text. Most of these are explanations of context or highlights of parallels, drawing out the facts that we miss by …

Foolishness: 1 Corinthians 1

In Summary: 1 Corinthians opens with the standard greeting of a letter from the Apostle Paul. He tells who he is with (Sosthenes) and who he is writing to. In this case, that is the “church of God that is in Corinth.” He further specifies that this church is made up of those who are sanctified in Christ Jesus and called to be saints. 
He then expresses the blessing/greeting of “grace and peace” from God. From there, Paul reflects on his initial involvement with the Corinthian people and the beginning of the church. After that, though, there are problems to deal with and Paul is not hesitant to address them. He begins by addressing the division within the church. Apparently, the church had split into factions, some of which were drawn to various personalities who had led the church in times past. There is no firm evidence, or even a suggestion, that Paul, Cephas, Apollos, or anyone else had asked for a faction in their name. Further, the “I follow Christ” faction may not have been any le…