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Showing posts from December, 2016

Sermon Recap for December 25

Well, it’s the last sermons of the year. Here is the complete Christmas Eve service (it was filmed from the balcony with the condenser mic, so the sound is a bit different) and then Sunday morning’s sermon.December 25 AM (Audio) Matthew 1

It's not about the Signs: Matthew 24

In Summary:
Jesus leaves the Temple, after lamenting that Jerusalem’s “house is being left…desolate” (Matthew 23:38). As He does this, the disciples point out the Temple buildings. Given that Jesus had been there more than once or twice, it is likely the implication is one of highlighting the impressive nature of the structure. Jesus is, well, not impressed. He is well aware of the future of the building. Not one stone will be left another (24:2).

The disciples are, understandably, distressed by this statement. As a result, they ask Jesus about when these events will occur. The answer from Jesus is not nearly as comforting as most of us would like. He describes a world that begins falling apart, tribulations, and judgment. Not exactly a pleasant picture.

The chapter closes out with a reminder to be ready because we do not know the day and the hour when Jesus returns. Actually, let us be very specific. He states it this way: “you do not know which day your Lord is coming.” (Matthew 24:…

Book: The Message of the Twelve

I will admit it: I’m way behind on book reviews. I’ve had this handy volume from B&H for a couple of months. Sorry about that.The Minor Prophets. Those twelve pesky short books at the end of the Old Testament. You know which ones I’m talking about---the part of your ‘read through the Bible in a year’ plan that you dread the most. Why do we read these? Apart from Micah 5:2 and maybe Malachi 3, do we even have sermons about them?A good step in fixing this neglect is found in Richard Alan Fuhr & Gary E. Yates’ The Message of the Twelve. The authors dig into the Minor Prophets and help us see how God uses this portion of inspired Scripture even to this day. First, the work explains why all twelve are treated together. This grouping is also called the Book of the Twelve, and they should not be treated as unified only by their size. The first section of The Message of the Twelve addresses why one should study all of these together as well as the separate books.I found this a bit mor…

Sermon Recap for December 18 2016

Good morning! Here is Sunday morning’s sermon. Sunday night was the community choir event at East Union, so we dismissed our services so those who wanted to could participate.December 18 AM: Revelation 12 (audio here)
Saving ChristmasSaving ChristmasDoug Hibbard / GeneralRevelation 12Christmas is in Danger
Not from Abominable Snowmen or Hidden Clauses
Not from Happy Holiday-wielding Businesses
Not from the ACLU
Or from the...."them." Whoever "Them" might be
The Real Dangers:
1. Satan (defeated)
2. False religion
3. World Oppression
4. Silent Witnesses
5. Us. The church.Exported from Logos Bible Software, 8:15 AM December 20, 2016.

Spies and Promises: Joshua 2

In Summary:
After an interlude when Joshua is commissioned to take command, the narrative story of Israel continues with Joshua 2. Joshua sends two spies into Jericho to check out the situation. Then, things get exciting.

Overall, this chapter is worthy of a good action movie. You have a secret mission into foreign territory. Your spies make it as far as an inn at the edge of town, where they are found out. The king (keep in mind, kings ruled over cities in that era) sends word to the innkeeper to hand over the spies. She doesn’t. Instead, she hides them, deceives the king, and helps the enemies of her nation escape. There’s enough intrigue for a thriller.

And then you have the potential scandal, as shown in the labeling of Rahab as a harlot or prostitute (see NASB and ESV in Joshua 2:1). The word and grammar here are vague enough to suggest that Rahab was, at times, engaged in such a profession but that she was also an innkeeper. Without getting too nerdy here, I have seen some comme…

Book: Martin Luther

Please note, the book is a biography of Martin Luther. I’m not reviewing Martin Luther. Also, today’s book was provided by Cross Focused Reviews.Some years ago, a blog tour first brought the Christian Biographies for Young Readers series into our home. Now, they have become a fixture in our learning processes. The most recent entry in this series is Martin Luther. (Isn’t nice how easy it is to title a biography?) Simonetta Carr has again provided more information in 64 pages than one would have thought possible.First, she does an excellent job providing an overview of the complicated situation of the sixteenth century, including the selling of indulgences by the Church at the time. Carr’s summary uses some terms that are anachronistic (I doubt Luther considered his work to go “viral,” p. 22,) but these terms make plain the meaning.Second, the history reads like I am familiar with from much more in-depth books. For a 64-page children’s biography, the detail is excellent and, more impor…

Sermon Recap for Dec 12

Good morning! Here is Sunday morning’s sermon. Sunday night was a bit less structured than it normally is…so it’s not here.Sermon: John 1:1-5 (audio here)&nbsp
Unconquerable LightUnconquerable LightDoug Hibbard / GeneralJohn 1:1–5&nbspJohn 1:1-5
John 1:1–5 NASB95&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp He was in the beginning with God.
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp All things came into being through Him, and apart from Him nothing came into being that has come into being.
&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp In Him was life, and the life was the Light of men.
&nbsp&nbsp The Light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not comprehend it.The&nbsp darkness&nbsp&nbsp around&nbsp us
The&nbsp darkness&nbsp&nbsp before&nbsp us
The&nbsp darkness&nbsp&nbsp beneath&nbsp us
The&nbsp darkness&nbsp&nbsp within&nbsp us
The&nbsp Light&…

Woe There! Matthew 23

In Summary:
As we reach Matthew 23, Jesus is no longer taking questions from the Pharisees and other religious leaders of Israel. He isn’t asking them questions, either. He begins to directly address their sinful behavior and the destruction they have wreaked on the people of Israel.

It is noteworthy that His first comments are not directed to the scribes and Pharisees. His first statements are directed to the crowd. Jesus does not take the religious leaders aside and rebuke them privately or calmly. He warns the people who the religious leaders are trying to lead. (I’m fairly certain that there are implications of this for modern religious leaders who need rebuking. Uncomfortable implications.) The primary warning to the crowd is that they should not become like their leaders.

He tells the crowd that their teachers are saying admirable things, but that their lives are not worth following (v. 3). He then goes on to present the right approach to the Kingdom of Heaven: service and sacri…

Sermon Recap for December 4

Merry Christmas! I know, we have three more Sundays until Christmas, but I like this time of year. Sunday Morning Sermon: Isaiah 53 (audio)Sunday evening was our annual budget business meeting. We voted to increase our financial involvement in mission work as well as maintaining our partnership level with the Southern Baptist Convention.I did share a few thoughts on Matthew 1. And I can’t find where I put the SD card with the video. When I find it, you’ll see it.Remember our Christmas Eve service is coming up on December 24 at 6:30 PM.