Thursday, December 31, 2009

Proverbs 31 by Doug

Proverbs 31:1 (NRSV) –>Taught by his mother.  Be extraordinarily careful not to disregard real wisdom simply because you think everything has to come from a man.

 

Proverbs 31:3-4 (NRSV) –>Not for kings to drink or chase women…can you imagine what she would say to Congress?

 

Proverbs 31:6-7 (NRSV) –>This is not to suggest a government program to hand out liquor to the poor.  Just to point out that for the king, he has no reason to forget, so no reason to drink.

 

Proverbs 31:8 (NRSV) –>This is one of the primary Biblical justifications for political action, especially on behalf of the unborn. 

 

Proverbs 31:10 (NRSV) –>Some Biblical scholars draw a line between verse 9 and verse 10, and say this starts a separate segment after the oracle of King Lemuel’s Mother.  Why?  Who better to tell a man what kind of wife to seek than a wise mom?

 

Proverbs 31:27 (NRSV) –>There is a point of needed rest.  Then, there’s a point of idleness.  Where are you?

Wednesday, December 30, 2009

I wish to be left alone!

I wish to be left alone!


Somehow, we went through the Christmas season and watched 1 Christmas movie. That's it, just one! It The Muppet Christmas Carol , which, I must admit, is still my favorite interpretation of that story. While there are liberties taken from the original, such as making Scrooge partners with the Marley Brothers, rather than just Jacob, they don't disrupt the storyline. The change is simply to allow the use of Statler and Waldorf as Marley, which seems almost what Henson created them for years ago.


However, thinking about Scrooge, I think about his remark the gentlemen that are raising funds for the poor and destitute at Christmas. Scrooge expresses that he wishes “ to be left alone” when asked to help. Audiences and readers have long cringed at his retort, and it exposes his heartlessness.


Yet how often do we respond in this manner in our own hearts? We won't openly scoff that we wish to be left alone, but even the basics of human compassion are often too much effort. Why?


Because, in truth, it's hard. It is so much easier to hunker down into our little protective zones and disconnect.


I know that I have to be more willing to express compassion and build those efforts into meaningful work in the lives of others. Will I be successful? Likely I'll waffle on this, back and forth between being open, too open, too closed, and then back to some balance.


It's worth working on, though...


Doug


Proverbs 30 by Doug

 

Proverbs 30:1 (NRSV) –>"How can I prevail?” is how the NRSV translates the last phrase here.  I can feel that pain.  How do we prevail? I think that Agur was tired, stressed out, and probably burned out.  He was striving to do right, but couldn’t get anyone to go with him.  How could he prevail? Look on down to verse 5:

 

Proverbs 30:5 (NRSV) –>”Every word of God” is how we prevail. It’s not by our strength or by our own wisdom, but by the power of God.  And when we are too weary to keep trying, take refuge in Him.

 

Proverbs 30:6 (NRSV) –>Adding to anyone’s words is a recipe for a quick rebuke.  How much more to add to God’s!  Yet we see it happen frequently, whether it be by adding more laws or saying God has changed His mind about something.  We must be very careful.  By the way, if it’s your opinion, say so! Be prepared to explain it.  Even if it’s just your intuition or gut feeling.  But don’t attribute it to God!

 

Proverbs 30:8-9 (NRSV) –>I’ll pray half of this, but the half about not being full or rich is tough.  Really tough.

 

Proverbs 30:14 (NRSV) –>How did “Sticks and stones can break my bones but words can never hurt me!” become a saying when there is abundant evidence and Scripture to show otherwise?  Words can hurt me.  Much of the pain from sticks we can recover from.

 

Proverbs 30:33 (NRSV) –>Need proof the Bible is true?  Press fresh milk and see if you get curds.  Need more proof?  Press your nose.  Hard.  Get blood?  Maybe there is some truth here.

Tuesday, December 29, 2009

Testing Things Out

Testing things out….

I’ve got a new piece of software to do blog posts, so this is just a test to see how it works.  I’m currently in the middle of trying to take this week and plan out my preaching for most of the coming year.  It’s something I’ve heard other preachers talk about doing, and I always thought they were crazy.  Why?
I.  Who has the time to take a week off?  But, in reality, the biggest part of my responsibility is to know what I’m doing when I stand up to teach.  So, taking a week to make sure I’m organized in that regard for a year isn’t such a bad plan, is it? 
II.  Who sticks with a plan for that long?  Well, first of all, I’m not going to be legalistic about the plan, but it really makes more sense to be prepared.  It’s much better to adjust a plan than to have to make it up as you go.
III.  Who can focus on it?  Well, this week hasn’t been as easy as I had hoped.  A lot of preachers that do this go off into the woods or out of town for the week.  I’m just trying to use the church while the office is supposed to be closed.  Of course, there are still distractions and such, but I’m tucked away from the phone.  Naturally, there are people that think I’m not working, but I am, in fact, buried in Matthew.
What does this have to do with trying new things?  I’m still trying out and learning how to do this thing called “pastor” that I am.  It’s not exactly as I pictured, and it takes some learning and getting used to.  So, be patient with me.  Be patient with yourself, too.  You’re probably not always at your best.
We must strive to get there, though.  Inadequacy is a normal feeling, but inaction is not the response.  Action to learn, action to grow, these are the responses we need.

Doug

Wednesday, December 23, 2009

Derailed by Tim Irwin

Book Review---Derailed by Tim Irwin, Ph.D.

Ok, so this isn't a book review I'm beholden to do for Thomas Nelson and the Book Review Bloggers Program. Instead, it's a book that Michael Hyatt, the CEO of Thomas Nelson gave away to some of his blog readers recently. (Note that his blog is down for redesign until after Christmas.) So, I did get the book free, but am not expected to do anything but read it.

One of the joys I've had this past year is reading a few more business books than I previously have. Why haven't I read them in the past? Well, it's always bothered me that we seem to readily grab business practices into a church without considering the differences between church and business. Also, like anyone else, I've got a limited budget, and so must choose wisely what books I purchase. Generally, if it's something I'm unsure of, I wait for it to be cheap or until I get a chance to go the library. By then, though, I've either forgotten about it or the message isn't timely.

So, when Michael Hyatt decided to give away a stack of Derailed to his blog readers a few weeks ago, I jumped at the chance. I have spent some time in business, and, though I hope to never go back to corporate work, welcomed the chance to stretch my brain with a little business reading.

Then I hit the subject material. As the name implies, Derailed is about things not going right. Well, I've read a book or two like that before, such as John Maxwell's Failing Forward. So, I thought this would be a book with more recent examples of failures that people used to build into success. I was wrong on that assumption.

This book is about business in the same way The Blind Side is about football. The stories used as examples are found in the business world, but this work is about character. It's about what business reveals about the people that do it.

As such, my typical concern for badly applying business models into Biblical churches is unnecessary here. Instead, the danger is reversed, that churches and church leaders will see these as failings of “business” people that were chasing worldly wealth and so faltered from it.

If that happens, we'll miss valuable lessons about the people involved. We'll risk not seeing how we could improve the relationships which are the backbone of our organizations. We'll risk not seeing how the character of our leaders is what is most significant.

Worse than that, I would have missed it. Derailed is a cautionary work, but not of bad business decisions, but of character shortcomings. Some of the issues raised are a lack of character, others simply that one person's character wasn't right for their situation.

I won't give away the details, but Irwin has provided some warning signs to watch for and corrective actions to take when you see those signs. I'd highly recommend this book for anyone looking to make their way in the business world.

It's also an excellent read for people in the ministry world. Barring a re-release of J.D. Grey's Epitaphs for Eager Preachers, this should be mandatory reading for upcoming ministers to remind us of how important who we are is.

Doug

Oh yeah...to make it easy, if you want to check this book out on Amazon, I put in a link to it.

Wednesday, December 9, 2009

Thermostats...

Expectations and results....

December 9 2009

Doug


One of the things that I do, in fact the main thing I do, is that I pastor a small Baptist church in Southeast Arkansas. Part of our weekly schedule is a prayer hour on Tuesday nights at 8. To get ready for that time yesterday, I went over and tinkered with a few thermostats before I went home.


When I got back at 8, it was colder in the building than outside. This isn't unusual, since the weather here in Monticello was a little strange yesterday, with lots of cold, then rain, then warm, and I thought the building just never warmed up. I had only set the thermostats to about 64, because it's a small group that meets, and those that come know to dress warmly!


Well, this morning I went over to make sure all of the thermostats were set for church tonight. I then noticed something that I missed last night. I had set all of temperatures to 64. Unfortunately, I had also turned one of the major units to “Cool” instead of heat. All that time, the unit had been trying to chill a room rather than warm it.


Fortunately for the electric bill, when the outside is in the 40s, it's not hard to chill a metal building into the 60s, but there's a lesson here. It's a lesson about efforts, expectations, and results. What do I mean?


Well, if we want to have results, we have to make sure our efforts are going in the right direction, and that our expectations are set to a logical level. How?


  1. Sometimes our efforts are like the heat/air units yesterday: 3 separate units had the goal of a temperature of 64 degrees. 2 were trying to heat to it; 1 to cool to it. At times, they were working against each other. You can almost imagine the inner monologues: “It's getting warm again! I just cooled it off. Who's messing with my work?” “Just as soon as I get it warm some nut starts chilling it again. This isn't fair!” (Fortunately, inanimate objects don't think. I can't fathom that people would do that, can you? Well, maybe a little.)

  2. The method of reaching a goal is more important than we realize. It was my expectation that 64 would be warm enough. It would have been, had there not been cold air blowing in to keep it at that temperature. The result was right, but the method used caused it to not meet expectations.

  3. Do we watch the details? This was a mistake of about a half-inch on a switch. Little slips make bigger issues if we're not careful!

  4. For those of us who lead others: are we careful to communicate the expected methods as well as results? This was my mistake, and is often a critical point for me in working with others. It's not just where you end up, but how you get there. I communicated I wanted a temperature. I didn't communicate that I wanted it warm.



It's often frustrating because I think I'm doing the best I can, but what I want to see happen isn't happening. I need to examine how often it's because the efforts are wasted because of a minor setting....


Doug


Tuesday, December 8, 2009

Romans 2:6--Doug's Tuesday Thought

Romans 2:6
Doug's Tuesday Thought
December 8, 2009

I'm reading through the book of Romans, and I've gotten all the way to chapter 2 so far. It's only taken about 2 months to get through chapter 1, though I haven't commented on it very much. I've got the notes in my journal, and hope to someday get them all transcribed.

Today, though, I wanted to comment on Romans 2:6, where Paul points out that God will judge all people according to their deeds. Verses 7 and 8 tell us that those with evil deeds will get wrath, and those with good deeds will receive blessing. Sounds great, right?

This is theology that most of us would like to stop with. The good get rewarded, the bad get punished. Hurrah! Because I'm good, right?

Well, not so much---you've got to read on into the letter. Paul points out that we're all sinners. We're all bad. None of us get to qualify for Romans 2:8, we're all stuck with Romans 2:7.

What separates from that wrath? What allows us to see Romans 2:8 as more than a mocking “you'll never get this!”?

Christmas does. It's not about a baby or a star or shepherds or wise men...it's about the Grace of God. About His goodness being more than enough for us. Christmas isn't about the naughty/nice list. It's about the list not mattering anymore, because God overwrote with the glory of Christ.

Doug

December 8 by Doug

Reflections on Proverbs

December 8 2009

by Doug





Proverbs 8:9 (NRSV) →True wisdom is completely pure before God, not devious at all.





Proverbs 8:10 (NRSV) →Instead of---not first, not to get riches, but instead of the riches. We should pursue wisdom rather than wealth, and be satisfied to live with the wisdom.





Proverbs 8:22-31 (NRSV) →Here is your grand unified theory of everything: behind the strings, chaos, and quantums, behind the quarks and photons, behind relativity and gravity, is the Wisdom of God.

Monday, December 7, 2009

Christmas giving suggestions 2009

Christmas Giving Suggestions for 2009

by Doug


Last year I posted some suggested thoughts for places that could use a little extra help at Christmas time. In that same vein, I'd like to post some suggestions for this year.


Why? Well, truth be told, we as Americans have a bit of a conundrum. We have a lot of people that our culture seems to expect us to give gifts to, but most of them don't really need anything. Seriously, your children's school teachers appreciate the thought, but how many “#1 Teacher” ornaments do they need? And are you getting stressed out about what to give your 2 nd cousin twice removed that you don't even like? I'm not against giving sincere gifts from the heart, but I don't care for giving that's driven by guilt. So, a few suggestions:


#1: For the people that absolutely need to have something given to them (you know, spouses and such):


Check out:

World Crafts Village: Small businesses that help lift people from poverty, especially in regions of the world that Christians are placed into economic turmoil. A project partially driven by the WMU.


Abba Java: For the Coffee lover in your life! While I like the brand of coffee I usually drink, this company purchases coffee from local growers in Africa, and the profits sustain orphan care. Does it get better than that? Not much, no.


Trade as One: There's a lot of back-and-forth about trade and economics. This isn't the place for that debate, but this I know: we Americans have more wealth than most people in the world. Trade as One is a great place to purchase gifts that support local economies around the world, helping lift people out of poverty. The kind of poverty that prevents people from eating for days or having clean water. Not the kind that requires them to eat off-brand or wear the same clothes twice.


ROWArt: Rivers of the World is an evangelistic Christian missions group, and ROWART is a website where they sell donated artwork and also locally produced items by the people groups that they are working in. The trade allows them freer interaction with the people, the funds keep the missions running, and you get something that few other people have got. How can you lose? I like ROW. I've never bought from ROWArt, but ROW is a group Ann and I have supported.


#2: For the people that don't need anything but a card and to know they're a part of making a difference in the world: (make sure the card expresses genuine thanks to them and the specific project you are helping!): Note: I am linking to the front page of these groups so you can read more about them. They should all have clearly marked “Give” or “Donate” links on the front page if you like what you see.


Rivers of the World: A missions organization that works with whatever people they can find up whatever remote rivers they can get a boat up. Their work at Monkey Point, Nicaragua, last year resulted in the Iranian Army leaving the area. Ben Mathes is a hoot at that.


Wycliffe Bible Translators: Near and dear to our hearts, the mission of Wycliffe is to put the Bible in the native language of people that don't have it. Some of our dearest friends, the Choates, do this. Consider helping Wycliffe in general or their Last Languages emphasis. Wycliffe wants to be out of business in 2025 due to completing their task. Let's help them get there.


Living Water International: Did you know there is, actually, enough water for everyone to have clean, healthy water? It's more about access than supply. And millions die every year because their water is diseased. Let's fix it. Before we buy another bottle of Dasani or Aquafina.


The Lottie Moon Christmas Offering: Really, what kind of Southern Baptist would I be if I didn't bring this up? Contact your local Southern Baptist Church and give to help spread the Gospel of Jesus Christ. The angels showed up at Christmas to tell. Let's keep telling.


Local children's charities: I like the Arkansas Baptist Children's Homes. You may prefer someone local to you. Or perhaps a Crisis Pregnancy Center like Hope Place in Monticello, Arkansas. Pick one. Help kids. Help women in crisis through a women's shelter.


Contact your local fire department, police department, or National Guard Armory to see what you can do for families of the fallen or deployed.


Make this year about more than just what you get or even what you give your family. Put a true value in the gift. You'll be glad you did. They'll be glad you did. Seriously, the PS3 or the Wii will just be obsolete in a year.



Merry Christmas!


Doug


Proverbs 7 by Doug for December

Reflections on Proverbs

December 7 2009


Proverbs 7:1 (NRSV) →It's really not enough to know where to find knowledge and wisdom. You need to commit it to memory, to carry it in your mind and heart. There is no substitute for that, as sometimes you cannot look it up.


Proverbs 7:4-5 (NRSV) →A trustworthy, intimate sister. The kind that warns you about the girls that can't be trusted. This is wisdom...because the deceptive danger is hard to separate.


Proverbs 7:7 (NRSV) →Look at the parallelism. Without engaging in parallelomania (with apologies to both D.A. Carson and Samuel Sandmel, where Carson got the term), there is a fairly clear parallelism here showing youth and simplicity as essentially the same. The young are simple. It's not a fault, but a reality. Are we providing them the path to wisdom in God or are we leaving them to be simple later?


Proverbs 7:10 (NRSV) →She's not a prostitute, but she's dressed as one....there are times and ways that we should distinctly avoid certain fashions and choices because they are blatant marks of sinful behavior. In Jordan, for example, when my wife was growing up, having multiple earrings was the mark of a woman with loose morals. Why pick the fight and say you can have multiple earrings and not be loose? Would it not be better to hold back? Not that this sign applies in America, but we have other indicators. There are certain fashions that communicate desires and intentions...why bother with them? Why not stay away from displaying things that show blatant materialism?


Because we don't want to follow wisdom. That's why, and it's killing us.



Doug


Friday, December 4, 2009

Book Review---Living with Confidence

Book Review: Living with Confidence in a Chaotic Worldby Dr. David Jeremiah



A frequent refrain among Christian believers is that “We've read the end of the book, it's all going to be okay!” While that is often a comforting thought, it's not always a practical one. Sure, then end of the book sounds great, but have you read the 20 chapters before that? There's going to be a lot of chaos before we get to that end.


This book is aimed at dealing with that chaos, and how we as Christians hang on through it. There are some basic ideas presented differently than other places, but this isn't exactly new ground Dr. Jeremiah is plowing here. Which isn't to say it's a bad book, nor that he should be plowing new ground. As the world does grow more chaotic, a reminder of solid roots and basic foundations is more valuable, at least in my mind, than untested innovation. It's well organized and structured to be an easy read. Also, the chapter organization also lends itself to referring back to specific points.


Is this book worth your time? If you don't read many books on the practical implications of theology and prophecy, it's worth your time. If you listen to David Jeremiah on the radio and want what he says in print so you can look back at it, it's a good buy. If you read lots of other books by conservative Bible preachers about this subject, this one might be a little repetitive.


This book is published by Thomas Nelson Publishers.




Disclaimer: In all fairness to the world at large, as the FCC is charged with defending, I read Living with Confidence in a Chaotic World simply because the Thomas Nelson Book Review Bloggers program gave me a free copy of the book. And, given the enormous following of blog readers I have, they wisely chose not to provide me any additional compensation other than the free book, which will eventually be given to someone I encounter in ministry that I think the book will help. If you would like to be shamelessly corrupted by the free books being given away with no other compensation by the Thomas Nelson Book Review Bloggers program, check this link: http://brb.thomasnelson.com. Otherwise, you should stay away from that webpage, and just go to http://www.amazon.com and buy your own books. I do not get any compensation from Amazon for the referral. I should. Maybe a few months free on my Prime Membership? How about it Mr. Bezos? I'll even write a review of the service for it...


Thursday, December 3, 2009

Pictures....and thumb drives

Taking up space....

December 3


Since shortly before Olivia was born, Ann and I have been the proud owners of a digital camera. Our first was an Olympus D-something, which we greatly enjoyed. It was a 1.3 mexapixel point and shoot, and used a 32 MB smart media card. I think we could get around 200 pictures on it.


Then we got our second one, also an Olympus, supposed to be slightly better than the one we had. I don't remember the resolution, just the battery hungry ways. I don't know how many pictures you could put on it, because the batteries only held out for about 5!


Now we use a Kodak Easyshare, with rechargeable batteries, and a 1 GB SD card. This one will hold about 600 pictures or so.


Moving on, Ann loves taking pictures of the kids, and I love the fact that digital photos don't take as much space to store. Neither are they heavy to move.


However, organization is one of our concerns for the veritable cornucopia of pictures we have. Back-up in case of computer failure is another concern. So, what solution did we seek?


I bought Ann 4 Kingston thumb drives: 3 4GB drives, one for each child, and an 8GB for other pictures. That way, she can organize onto those drives, and we can store them in the fire-proof file box we have in the closet.


So, I'm looking at the files, and I've realize something. I think our picture files are small, because I haven't really paid much attention since that first camera. Guess what?


We already have 18 GB worth of pictures. Steven's alone are 5 GB. Olivia has the smallest file, though she has the most pictures, because many of hers are from the older camera.


Why the difference? The files are bigger. Now, technically, the resolution is greater, so the pictures are higher quality, but that makes them get bigger. Bigger takes more space, even in the digital world.


It starts me thinking about the things we carry around in life. Our actions are, in a way, like taking pictures. What we choose to do is a snapshot of what matters to us at that moment, and our memories carry around those effects.


What becomes the challenge for us is that, like the picture files on our computer, as we grow and mature, our actions store with a higher resolution. There's more detail, more connection. More lasting impact. And they take up more space, require more effort to deal with.


It's not guaranteed to be a bad thing, but it could be, if we're not mindful of our actions. Are you considering what you choose each day? The longer you go, the more impact those decisions bear on you.


Doug


Ladies' Christmas Fellowship

 

You’re Invited To

A Ladies Christmas Fellowship

Saturday, December 5 th

6 pm

In the Fellowship Hall

 

Please make plans to attend; we always have a fun time together.

 

We will have potluck finger foods followed by a devotion. We will then be making 3 lady’s gift baskets that the children will be delivering on December 16 th. Please bring an item to put in one of the baskets (ex. Lotion, notepad, pen candle, ornament….). Us your imagination!

 

Secret sisters may exchange gifts at this time in they wish.

 

Ask Karen or Gail if you have any questions.

 

Hope to see you there!



Wednesday, December 2, 2009

Forgiveness and Privacy

On forgiveness and confession and privacy

December 2 2009


Okay, so no one is screaming for my opinion on the current mess Tiger Woods is in over his personal life. However, the joy of blogging is that you get to give your opinion on stuff whether or not people are asking for it.


So, what about Tiger?


He, apparently, screwed up in his personal life. Yes, indeed, a sports star once again proves insufficient for a hero about how to actually live life.


You know what? Tiger Woods isn't paid to be a personal role model. He's paid to play golf and sell stuff that people will buy because an awesome golfer tells them to buy. That's it. For the most part, his personal life really isn't our business.


However, it's come out in public, and how has he handled it? Well, first he tried to hide. Then he tried to deflect. And now he has come out, given a guarded admission that he did do some things he shouldn't have, and asked for privacy to work it out with his family. Remarkably, the text of his latest statement, as read by ESPN from his website, even referred to his actions as sins! That's a better confession than you'll ever get from a politician.


And that should be enough for us. Think about it. Your life isn't completely private either, but how much do you want your sins publicly dissected? What, you think you have a right to privacy? But you live out in the open, you expect certain public reactions, even if just in your own small town life. So, you are a public figure, even if not a national one. So, extend the man the same courtesy. Extend others the same courtesy.


Allow, and in church, expect public sin to carry public repentance, but don't demand all the sordid details. You don't need them. If someone has sinned against you, you know the details, they know the details, and God knows the details. If they haven't sinned against you, then that they have sought forgiveness from those they have sinned against and from God ought to be enough for you. That they will admit to needing it is enough for us to restore people to fellowship.


As for Tiger---I hope that he and his wife find peace with each other and with God. For the other people involved, a prayer that they can find better satisfaction in life than secret affairs that really bear no relationship to love.


And for us, as a nation, how about a fixation on things that matter instead? How about husbands, fathers, preachers, and deacons being the male role models for our children? You know, people that live the same type of ordinary life that most of our children will go on to live?


Crazy thought, huh?


Doug


Sunday, November 29, 2009

November 29--Sermons Outlines from Today

I thought I'd post you the sermon outlines I preached from today.  I've actually never taken a course in sermon preparation, though I graduated from college with a speech minor and so have lots of training in speech preparation.  There are some differences in the two, but the biggest issue is this: speech outlines, really, look different than sermon outlines.  So, if this doesn't look like what you think a sermon outline should look like, you're right.  It doesn't.

One of my goals, by the way, is to get back and finish seminary, which will require a sermon class or two.  Which, by the way, is intimidating.  Sermon professors are usually well experienced old preachers who know how it should be done, and don't like any nonsense.  Which can be challenging.  Also challenging is the fact that you're preaching to a class of preachers, most of whom are sitting there thinking how they could do it better, and aren't afraid to say so.


Hope you can gather some good from this...


Doug


Date: November 29, 2009 AM

Text: Matthew 1:1-5

Location: CBC Monticello

Theme: Jesus as Son of Abraham


  1. The Coming Christ is the Son of Abraham

    1. The Promise: Genesis 12:2-3

      1. God makes a promise in Genesis to Abraham that He would make Abraham great and bless all nations through Him

      2. This promise is God's plan to redeem mankind from the beginning

      3. All nations would be blessed

    2. The Predicament

      1. The sacrifice in Genesis 22

      2. God warns in advance that the true Son of the promise will have to be sacrificed

    3. The Provision

      1. Abraham recognizes in Genesis 22:8 that “God will provide Himself” the needed sacrifice

      2. And so, we find in the opening of Matthew's Gospel that God is providing Himself the sacrifice:Jesus Christ

    4. Jesus Christ is the son of Abraham: The Promise to all nations of the blessing of redemption and relationship, by the provision of the perfect sacrifice for our sins, given by God Himself.


Date: November 29 PM

Text: Philippians 1:9-11

Location: CBC Monticello

Theme: Sincere, Blameless, Filled


  1. How we ought to be living

    1. Sincerity

      1. Words are not spoken in vain

      2. Our life backs up our words

    2. Blameless

      1. Refers to the intentions behind our actions

      2. And the perception of them.

      3. Are your actions blameless? Would a reasonable person think you were really out to be Godly in what you are doing?

  2. If we are living that way we will see ourselves:

    1. Filled with fruit:

      1. Fruit in the New Testament is most often associated with reproduction

      2. Not biological in this case, but spiritual\

      3. Our goal ought to be to bear fruit

      4. Our church and our lives are going to be judged based on whether or not we are bearing fruit

      5. What is this fruit?

      6. Disciples of Christ that follow after us!!!

        1. Count your fruit

        2. Consider the fruit of this church

        3. Are we going to be judged well or badly?

        4. If we are not seeing the fruit we desire, we need to go back to sincere and blameless and reconsider where we stand!


Saturday, November 28, 2009

November 28--Joshua 4:24

November 28 th


Joshua 4:24:

23 For the Lord your God dried up the waters of the Jordan for you until you passed over, as the Lord your God did to the Red Sea, which he dried up for us until we passed over, so that all the peoples of the earth may know that the hand of the Lord is mighty, that you may fear the Lord your God forever.



This verse comes shortly after the Israelites cross the Jordan River to conquer the Promised Land, but before they have actually fought anyone yet. Joshua is reminding them what is going on, what has gone on, and is letting them know what will happen.


So, what will happen? All peoples will know that God is mighty. This is one of the aspects of God's work in this world, and one of the reasons that he causes rain and sunshine to fall on both the righteous and the unrighteous (Matthew 5:45). Romans 1 reinforces the idea that the existence of a creation is enough to show most people that there is a creator. The continued sustaining of life shows the mighty hand of God to all people


Then we see this: that God's covenant people will fear him forever. Now, this is the reverential, worshipful type of fear. Not the “I'm so scared!” fear, but rather the “Wow, this is someone greater than me, and I'd like to keep him on my side” type of reaction.


I see here that, even in Joshua, we can understand that God has not limited himself to Israel, but is at work in the world at large. And then this: there have been, and probably always will be, two groups of people in this world: those who are partakers of the covenant, and those who are not.


Which one are you? Do you recognize that God offers a covenant, offers a relationship to those who will accept it? Or are you content for him to sustain and let you go on your own?


Doug


Thursday, November 26, 2009

Happy Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving


In celebration of Thanksgiving Day, here's the text of the Mayflower Compact, which was the foundation of civil law for the people that came to be known as the Pilgrims.


In the name of God, Amen. We whose names are underwritten, the loyal subjects of our dread Sovereign Lord King James, by the Grace of God of Great Britain, France and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, etc.
Having undertaken, for the Glory of God and advancement of the Christian Faith and Honour of our King and Country, a Voyage to plant the First Colony in the Northern Parts of Virginia, do by these presents solemnly and mutually in the presence of God and one of another, Covenant and Combine ourselves together into a Civil Body Politic, for our better ordering and preservation and furtherance of the ends aforesaid; and by virtue hereof to enact, constitute and frame such just and equal Laws, Ordinances, Acts, Constitutions and Offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meet and convenient for the general good of the Colony, unto which we promise all due submission and obedience. In witness whereof we have hereunder subscribed our names at Cape Cod, the 11th of November, in the year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord King James, of England, France and Ireland the eighteenth, and of Scotland the fifty-fourth. Anno Domini 1620.
(Yep, I copied and pasted that from wikipedia.)


Now, we know that all of American history hasn't really run rightly to the Glory of God or the advancement of Christian Faith and Honour. We don't even spell it honouranymore. And no, I don't think it's symbolic that we've takeuout ofhonour, henceuare no longer honorable. Yet I digress...
Our Founding Fathers were men of great intention and, generally, good heart. Were there ways and places they had shortcomings? No more than you or I do. That they are remembered today to be criticized for what they did not do is the result of what theydidaccomplish. They attempted and accomplished things many of us would never undertake.
I'm thankful for the good examples that are left for us by the men and women that persevered through those years. So, today, if you've got a roof over your head and food to eat, time to stare a computer or watch some football, let's be positive and thankful for what we do have. We can dwell on the lessons learned the other 364 days a year.
So, what are you doing today that will make you memorable enough that people 400 years from now will find fault with you?



Tuesday, November 24, 2009

About Doug...

So, who is Doug?

I'm a follower of Jesus Christ, who died to save the world from sin.  I find myself more in awe of His grace and the wonder and majesty of God every day.

I'm blessed to be married to Ann, who is much more amazing than words can ever tell.

I'm the father of Olivia, Angela, and Steven.  Sometimes, I'm glad I've only got 3.  Other days, I wonder why we have so few.

I am the Pastor of Calvary Baptist Church in Monticello, Arkansas.  We're a group of people that are trying to honor our heritage as a Baptist church while seeking our future as a part of God's Kingdom.

I am honored that you've read this far.  Hopefully you'll find somethings in this blog worth considering, and feel free to comment.  I alternate between moderated and not-moderated simply because of spam comments.  So, comment away. This is my blog, though, and while your views are your own, I'm responsible for what people read here, so if it gets profane or unnecessarily offensive and rude, I'll delete it.  Blogger and Wordpress both allow free blogs, so if you really want to spew, go get your own blog in your own name.

I don't blog every day.   My biggest responsibility is to my wife, then my children.  Then I'm responsible to teach and lead the church I pastor.  Beyond that, I blog to supplement my church leadership and to help myself grow through expressing thoughts.  I also occasionally blog book reviews for books I get for free.  Those reviews are clearly marked.  I don't derive any income from blogging at the present time, and doubt I ever will, though you can subscribe to this blog for your Amazon Kindle.  If you do, and don't feel like you're getting your money's worth, let me know!

Other things about me?  I'm still thinking about running for President in 2012, but I don't know if I can take enough vacation time.

Why do an "About me" now?  Because I just realized my template had an "About" shortcut that went nowhere.  So, I thought it would be good to give it a place to point.

Feel free to contact me through this blog if you have any questions! (hit the "contact tab" and take the extra spaces out of the email address!)

Friday, November 20, 2009

Skit Guys

I've been a long-time fan of a comedy duo called The Skit Guys.  They're a couple of youth ministry people that are quite entertaining. 

And they're trying to win the Doritos contest to be featured in the Doritos Superbowl Commercial or something like that.  These links take you to their videos.  I like the penguin one better.

http://www.crashthesuperbowl.com/#/video/5586

http://www.crashthesuperbowl.com/#/video/4855

Check it out!

Doug

Thursday, November 19, 2009

FREE!!! IT'S FREE!

Just because it's free....


So, I'm sitting here, trying to simplify my digital organization scheme. Why? Well, let's inventory what I have had, and some of it I still have:


3 Separate Google accounts: 1 straight-up, 2 domain/Google Apps.


Between them, these are connected to: 6 email addresses (not counting that I'm the domain admin for the 2 Apps accounts, and so I get any non-addressed email to those domains); 13 blogs; 7 Google calendars; 1 Google Voice account; 3 Google Docs accounts; and a Google gears app on my computer that I don't know what it does.


I also have Facebook account that is the admin on both a fan page and an organization page for the church plus a group page for ministers in Drew county.


I am the only one that does anything with the church website, which is free, and has a blog, calendar, and all sorts of other stuff, and it's great, but it doesn't link to anything else.


Plus I need all of this to sync back to my laptop, my Blackberry, the desk computer at home, some of it to the church desktop, and all the websites really need to communicate.


And it's not working. So I'm deleting 60% of it. Why do I even have it in the first place? Simple: it was free! Well, the domain registrations were $20 a piece for 2 years, but the rest is free!!!! And shouldn't we take advantage of free? I mean, really, what's it going to hurt?


Oh, I also review books so I can get them free. I've done them for Zondervan, Thomas Nelson (I still owe you guys on David Jeremiah's Living with Confidence! It's a great book! My chaotic world has kept me from reviewing. I'll get it, Mr. Hyatt, I promise!!), WaterBrook/Multnomah, and somebody else (I'm not even sure who!!). Point taken.


I'm a bit of an abuser of free, apparently. There's so much free available that I'll use it all, whether I need it or not. And that's not exactly a good thing. It shows a selfishness that we don't need any more of in our nation and culture. We certainly don't need it in our churches. We've become increasingly hooked on free.


We treat the free as if, since it's free to us, the price doesn't have to be paid somewhere. Guess what? Someone's buying the bandwidth at Google and Facebook. The paper and ink aren't free for review copies. That potluck you get to eat Sunday, someone cooked it, prepped it, planned it, and made it happen. The freedom we have to be thankful for this November? That forgiveness of sins, guess what, that grace? Yeah, it's free. For you.


Let's stop abusing free. Take what you need, but do your best to need less. It's not that Google's going to run out of bits or that God will exhaust His graciousness, but really, just because it's free to you doesn't mean you need to take all you can.


And yes, I just put those two together, because how we handle trivial things like billion dollar companies impacts how we handle stuff that matters, like our relationship with the Almighty God of the universe.


Doug


Tuesday, November 17, 2009

November 17 Hour of Prayer Guideline

Calvary Baptist Church Prayer Hour:


  1. Prayer for ourselves:

    1. That we stand rightly before God:

      1. 19Therefore, brethren, since we have confidence to enter the holy place by the blood of Jesus, 20by a new and living way which He inaugurated for us through the veil, that is, His flesh, 21and since we have a great priest over the house of God, 22let us draw near with a sincere heart in full assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled clean from an evil conscience and our bodies washed with pure water.

Heb 10:19-22 (NASB)

  1. Do we have unconfessed sin?

  2. Are we harboring any resentment toward others?

  3. Do we covet what others have?

  4. Are we focused on God and not on the things we are doing for Him or what we are 'giving up' for Him by taking time to pray?

    1. That we open our hearts to Him, acknowledging our dependence on Him

  1. Prayer for our families

    1. That our homes will be places of worship

    2. That our homes will be places of prayer

    3. That our homes will be places of discipleship

    4. That our homes will be places of outreach

  2. Prayer for Calvary Baptist Church

    1. That this will be a house of prayer

    2. That this will be a church committed to the truth

    3. That this will be a church committed to reaching Monticello

    4. That this will be a church committed to reaching the world

    5. That we will engage all ages with God's truth

  3. Prayer for Monticello, Arkansas and Drew County

    1. That all churches will focus on what matters: The Gospel of Jesus Christ

    2. That our communities will turn to Christ

  4. Prayer for our nation:

    1. That the Gospel will be preached by all churches

    2. That our hearts will turn to God

  5. Prayer for our world:

    1. That our fellow believers will be comforted in their suffering

    2. That our fellow believers will be bold in witness to Christ

    3. That we will work together to spread the Gospel to all people


What's going on here?

Okay, this isn't really a blog post, but a quick posting of where we are as a church.  I'd challenge any of you who are followers of Jesus to consider the situation, though.  Are you willing to give an hour of prayer for your church?


Dear Members of Calvary Baptist Church,

As we approach another season of Thanksgiving, it is easy to find the many things we have to be thankful for: God has been faithful through this past year; we continue to enjoy the freedom to worship Him, and we have seen some souls saved in the past 12 months. 

Yet we can also find many causes for concern.  First, people in Monticello and around the world step into eternity through death, and many go to eternal judgment.  Second, while we see a core of faithful members, Calvary Baptist Church does not draw in many new members. Finally, we can easily see that the moral, ethical, and financial      problems of our country have affected Monticello, and some of those challenges also challenge this church.

What can we do about it?  The answer is the same as it was for the disciples after the Ascension of the Lord Jesus Christ.  We must pray and seek His power.  Not in passing, not lightly, but crying out to God from the desperation
of our hearts.  From our desperation that people
not go to Hell.  From our desperation that our children
not falter from following Christ.  From our desperation that we, as a church of the Living God, not fail to
accomplish His purposes.

As your pastor, I am calling you to prayer.  Not because I don’t think you pray on your own.  Not because God does not hear your prayers when you pray alone.

Instead, it is because I believe we must come together to confess our need for Him.  We must come together to
demonstrate that nothing has a greater hold on us than
our commitment to the Lord Jesus Christ.

I’m calling on all of you who are physically able and not home-bound by young children to join me on Tuesday nights at 8 PM to pray.  Every Tuesday night, in the church sanctuary, we will gather with whomever will come to pray that our Heavenly Father will turn the tide of our hearts, of this church, of this city, and of this world.

If you are stuck-at-home on Tuesday nights, I issue the same call.  If you are willing to commit that hour, but can’t leave the house, write your name and phone number on this sheet and give it to me.  I’ll connect you with a prayer partner so that you can call and encourage each other in prayer on Tuesday nights.

It’s one hour.  It can be done, and it will move us to become the people God has called us to be.  The question is simply one of your willingness.

I’ll see you Tuesday night at 8.


Bro. Doug


Friday, November 6, 2009

Moving day is going to be November 7! So, here we go.

Any help is appreciated. All prayers greatly appreciated!

Thursday, October 29, 2009

Blog Breakdown

Actually, it's more like a life breakdown.  As in break it down, pack it up, move it across town, and set it up again.  Will return with a few blog snippets from the ABSC next week, and then back up full force.  Just leave me in your RSS reader, and I'll reappear magically.

Doug

Tuesday, October 20, 2009

October 20 by Doug

Reflections on Proverbs

October 20 2009

by Doug


Proverbs 20:3 (KJV)→Don't be a fool...quit meddling in other people's stuff.


Proverbs 20:4 (KJV) →Bother. Now I feel convicted for trying to sleep late.


Proverbs 20:6 (KJV) →Everybody talks. Who performs?


Proverbs 20:13 (KJV) →how much sleep do I really need? I know there's a minimum, but there's also a maximum for diligent living.


Proverbs 20:19 (KJV) →Don't tell secrets to people that try really hard to get them from you. They cannot be trusted.


Proverbs 20:21 (KJV) →Don't rush into getting your inheritance. It's not worth it.


Proverbs 20:22 (KJV) →This be hard sometimes. Well, most of the time, actually.


Doug


Daily Journal Oct 20

Daily Journal

October 20, 2009


Romans 1:16 →Are we ashamed of the Gospel? Of its effects in our lives? Of the fact that this is what we have to offer as Believers and as Churches? Why do we need to dress up the Gospel message rather than preach it as what it is?


Psalm 96 →Can you worship the Creator of the Universe, the Most High God, by bringing the ordinary before Him?


Joshua 1:16-18 →How well do we handle leadership transitions? Are we committed enough to God's promise and leadership that it doesn't matter the man involved?


Quote from Thomas Paine to consider: “The harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly; it is dearness only that gives everything its value. I love the man that can smile in trouble, that can gather strength from distress and grow brave.”


Good blog read for today: Emil Turner


Don't forget to check out Reflections on Proverbs!


Doug


Monday, October 19, 2009

October 19 by Doug

Reflections on Proverbs

by Doug

October 19 2009


By the way, I'm really starting to bog down on the “eths” of the King James. I am so thankful that God has allowed His word in language that can be understood!


Proverbs 19:3 (KJV) →How do I fret against the Lord in my actions? Do I really want the answer to that question?


Proverbs 19:4 (KJV) →Yet those many friends aren't true, for when poverty comes, they will abandon the wealthy man.


Proverbs 19:10 (KJV) →Fools don't deserve delight. Period. They need correction and trouble, and that's what they'll get.


Proverbs 19:11 (KJV) →Are you holding on to anger? It's glorious to let go of minor transgressions and not bother about it.


Proverbs 19:18 (KJV) →Sometimes, apparently, a parent should let, and even make, their child cry. Why? Because fundamentally, we're very selfish, and we need to get over ourselves.


Proverbs 19:19 (KJV) →And this is why, sometimes, it's better just to let people be mad and learn to get over it. If you smooth out their anger now, where will you be when they get angry again?


Proverbs 19:29 (KJV) →Bad stuff is coming if you don't do what's right. Really it is. You've been warned.


Doug


Daily Journal October 19 2009

Daily Journal

October 19 2009


Exodus 33:12-23 →Don't go without the presence of the Lord →It is this presence, God with us, that distinguishes us from the rest of the world.


Exodus 33:11 →Joshua starts to show he's not just the warrior in the story. Even when Moses leaves the tent, Joshua sticks around!


Joshua 1:15 →Should we rest before our brothers are safely and securely in their inheritance as well? What right do we have to do so? Since God has given us all of this material and peace here in America, how can we utilize it to help our fellow believers? How can we utilize it to bring people to peace with God?


Romans 1:15 →Paul is eager to preach in Rome. I wonder if he would have been as eager had he known how he would get to Rome. He might have been a little mixed on the idea. Yet, I think he would have remained eager to preach. Am I eager enough to preach the Gospel that I do not care if I must do it in chains?


Doug....


Wednesday, October 14, 2009

October 14 by Doug.

Reflections on Proverbs

October 14 by Doug


Proverbs 14:1 (KJV) → “ Plucketh” →Nitpick? Perhaps we should realize the long-term damage of little things.


Proverbs 14:2 (KJV) →despiseth who? The upright man or the Lord? Or perhaps both?


Proverbs 14:4 (KJV) →Oh that we would be less stressed about clean!


Proverbs 14:9 (KJV) →Mock at sin? But isn't that our national entertainment? What else will we be able to laugh at?


Proverbs 14:11 (KJV) →The righteous “tabernacle” here because they are just passing through, and how do we act? As if treating this life as permanent is a good thing? And why do we devalue those who live in tents and not houses, both really and metaphorically?


Proverbs 14:14 (KJV) →Backsliding puts you surviving on only what you have within you, and receives no increase from God's supply. Is that really what you want?


Proverbs 14:17 (KJV) →Must control temper. Repeat. Memorize. Mix with Proverbs 14:29. Repeat.


Proverbs 14:27 (KJV) →There is one good fear, and it's to fear the Lord God Almighty. Fear nothing else but Him and things will go well. Although a little concern about snakes is acceptable :)


Doug


Daily Journal October 14

Wednesday October 14

Daily Journal


Romans 1:9 →Who is the witness to efforts? Often, it's God. And sometimes that's tiring, because very little earthly encouragement comes in those times.


Joshua 1:11 →Promise-fulfillment is God's business, not man's, but rather I need to act on what God has promised and do what He says. Faith involves acting without time, as if the promised is already fulfilled.


Philippians 1:6 →God started in us, and God will complete it in us.


2 John →Love for Christ, the Church, the Truth, Each Other.


Philippians 4:1-9 →“The Lord is near” →If we would live like that! That the ills will soon be righted, the right put in perspective...


Things I've read today that I found valuable:


Justin Taylor's links on Seeing through, not with, the eye .


Voddie Baucham's book info about Perspectives on Family Ministry .


And don't forget to click over to Reflections on Proverbs!

Thanks!

Doug



Tuesday, October 13, 2009

October 13 Daily Journal

Daily Journal

October 13, 2009


It's one of those weeks. Where people that ought to know better apparently don't, and when I should be in control of myself and I'm not. Mainly looking forward to the short, yet relaxing vacation coming up. Then it'll be time to move! It's just across town, but it's still a pill...


Romans 1:9 →Preaching is a service to God, not just something we do, but rather a key portion of spreading the Gospel. The New Testament doesn't know a difference between missional and attractional, come and see or go and tell, relationship or proclamation, but rather that the people of God are so consumed by giving the truth of God and the glory of Christ that people are drawn to them, that their relationships allow for proclamation, that their proclamation builds relationships, that as they go, they tell, and others come to see.


Joshua 1:11 →Going where God leads requires some preparation on our part. Are we sitting around, expecting God to do all the work?


Proverbs 1:7 →Describes knowledge of God as the beginning of wisdom. Where do we start? With Him?


Psalm 106 →Who can speak of the Lord? Surely we ought to know Him and speak!


Philippians 1:6 →God began it. Not you. Him.


Check out Reflections on Proverbs today!


Doug


Oct. 13 by Doug

Reflections on Proverbs

October 13, 2009

by Doug



Proverbs 13:1 (KJV) →Wisdom learns close to home, rather than needing to drift to find itself.


Proverbs 13:3 (KJV) →There's a time to keep your mouth shut!


Proverbs 13:5 (KJV) →Do you hate lying? Not as in “I hated to lie like that” but that you actually refuse to do it?


Proverbs 13:10 (KJV) → Onlyby pride →Pride is the source of the conflicts and contentions among God's people. And people that deny God.


Proverbs 13:20 (KJV) →Surround yourself with people of wisdom, and you'll grow in your own understanding and wisdom. You'll also have counsel when you need it and you'll look smarter in the first place!


Proverbs 13:24 (KJV) →You don't love your child too much to discipline them. You hate them enough not to discipline them.


Tuesday Sports

Sports-related thoughts....even though it's supposed to be Theology day.

October 13, 2009


Just watched an interesting film on ESPN about the marching band for the Baltimore Ravens, and how they had been the band for the Baltimore Colts. It was fascinating in how this band formed to support the old Colts, who moved out of Baltimore in the midst of conflict. Later, the NFL placed the Ravens in Baltimore as an expansion team.


Through the course of this, the band that had formed continued to practice. It seems, on the one hand, to be the story of people that should have moved on with life. Yet the ending is remarkable. The Ravens come, 12 years after the Colts left. The new ownership and the new team declares the band their band, and now they are the Marching Ravens for the Baltimore NFL team. It's a feel-good story, mostly.


One of the things that struck me was how the new team allowed the band to continue as the “ Baltimore Colts” Marching Band for the first two years. In that time, the new team stadium was still being constructed, and they waited until moving into the new stadium to rename the band, get new band uniforms, and make some other changes. The stadium opened with a parade led by the band, which had been the last group on the field in the old stadium.


Why does this matter?


It's a story that shows how much symbolism and tradition really do matter. How they can communicate and teach things. How continuity of the undercurrents are important, even as the major points go through turmoil.


And it's all over a footballteam. Why do we have trouble learning these lessons in our churches, where we ought to be focused on things that are much more important? Why do we act like all that has gone before must be totally discarded? Why can we not maintain certain things that communicate the glory and grandeur of our heritage?


If a football team can figure out that some things are important enough to not let go of, what about matters of eternal importance? Notice that the Ravens don't play the same style of football as they did in the 1940s when the band first formed. The uniforms, the safety gear, the playbook have all changed. The players have changed. But two things have remained the same:


  1. The goal: it's still 100 yards, across the line. It's been the goal for quite some time.

  2. The band.


Don't knock yourself for being in the band. Bands stick.


Doug


Monday, October 12, 2009

Columbus Day Thoughts...

Monday Politics

October 12 2009

by Doug


It's Columbus Day! Did you know that? In Canada, it's Thanksgiving. Why? Well, probably not for Columbus, based on my hundreds of seconds of research, but more because it's a harvest celebration and, well, you have to harvest earlier in Canada.


So, what about Columbus Day? I've been taught two things about Columbus: he discovered America. And that he didn't discover America.


That if Columbus hadn't sailed in 1492, Europeans would have never come to the New World, and never had the benefits of being in the New World. And that if Columbus hadn't sailed in 1492, Europeans would never have come to the New World and destroyed the happy, idyllic life of indigenous people.


Usually, these arguments come from different people, with a tinge of bitterness between them. It's as if we can't recognize that certain things, in fact most things, carry benefits and drawbacks. Why can we not realize that, first of all, Columbus was the first in the “Age of Discovery” to come to the New World, and his coming spawned the European interest in America. No, he wasn't the first. There were Native Americans or Indians or Indigenous People Groups or whatever term you find either historically accurate or politically correct. The Vikings had been to Canada, and possibly farther. It's possible, though hard to prove, that others had crossed both the Atlantic and Pacific to the Americas. Yet no one was able to start a settlement until Columbus.


Did that have negative consequences? Certainly for some it did. Some in the New World, some in the Old World. However, don't buy the Disney-esque idyllic life in Native America at the time. Were there some advanced cultures? Yes, there were. Were there tragedies due to misunderstanding and abuses? Certainly there were. I think that, had technology been equal, the entire history would be very different, but that's another blog post.


My point is that we can, and should, recognize both the good and the bad in historical events. Columbus didn't come to the New World with evil intent. He didn't even have intent to show up.


And what can you do about it anyway? Pack up all people of European ancestry and ship us back to Europe?


We have to learn to take the good and the bad, to realize that what benefits some may hurt others, and that actions and decisions will have unintended, and sometimes unforeseen, consequences. That others might have done similar things to us before, and that it's ok to learn history with shaky heroes, and it's even ok to let the shakiness come later, instead of teaching kindergarteners all the problems with Columbus!


All that to say, while there are serious ills in our society today, our history really isn't any different from most other nations. There were wars and peacetimes, there were great actions and despicable actions, there were heroes and losers, there were victories which required there to be defeated parties. It's life. It's not some cut and dried cartoon.


We don't have to polarize everything. Really. So let Columbus discover America. Let's remember that, had Native Americans held tighter immigration laws, we wouldn't be here. Let's realize that the past is just that, past, and it's time to build a future from where we are now.


Doug


Sermon and Service Recap for November 8

Looks like I forgot to post this! Thank you!