Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from February, 2017

Foolishness: 1 Corinthians 1

In Summary: 1 Corinthians opens with the standard greeting of a letter from the Apostle Paul. He tells who he is with (Sosthenes) and who he is writing to. In this case, that is the “church of God that is in Corinth.” He further specifies that this church is made up of those who are sanctified in Christ Jesus and called to be saints. 
He then expresses the blessing/greeting of “grace and peace” from God. From there, Paul reflects on his initial involvement with the Corinthian people and the beginning of the church. After that, though, there are problems to deal with and Paul is not hesitant to address them. He begins by addressing the division within the church. Apparently, the church had split into factions, some of which were drawn to various personalities who had led the church in times past. There is no firm evidence, or even a suggestion, that Paul, Cephas, Apollos, or anyone else had asked for a faction in their name. Further, the “I follow Christ” faction may not have been any le…

Sermon Recap for February 19 2017

Good morning! Here are the sermons from this past Sunday:Sunday morning (Audio download is here)Note that I don’t really consider what I said Sunday Evening as a sermon—no real text.Sunday Evening (Audio Download Here)

Just like always

Kevin Costner has made three baseball movies. Field of Dreams is good. Of course, James Earl Jones plays the Wise Old Man in the film. It’s hard for not to be good. I haven’t seen Bull Durham in ages. At least a couple of decades, and I wasn’t paying great attention at the time. His third one has stuck with me, though—better than “If you build it, he will come…” (Spoiler alert: it’s about playing catch with Ghost Dad.)The third one is a bit less mystical. For the Love of the Game came out in 1999, and one night Ann and I rented it on VHS. We’ll talk about VHS later, Internet generation. Costner plays Billy Chapel, a 40-year-old pitcher for the Detroit Tigers. There’s a great story there, and I just spent 25 minutes skipping through a YouTube upload of it, but I won’t link it because it’s probably a copyright violation. I don’t remember how family-friendly the film is—but it’s not a kid movie. (Want a kid baseball movie? The Rookie, with Dennis Quaid. Watch the deleted scenes on the DV…

Book: Getting to “Yes, and…”

Well, this one’s a bit different from the usual fare of Bible materials and such. I’m working on broadening my horizons. Bob Kulhan’s book definitely stretched my thought processes. One thing we don’t do well in established churches is improv. Whether you leave it like that or add an “e.” Here’s what today’s book looks like: (Picture is linked to the author’s webpage for his book.)This probably isn’t the first think Bob Kulhan had in mind when he wrote Getting to “Yes And”, but here’s my first response: this book demonstrates exactly what we have lost in the general education of America as we set aside the arts for budgetary concerns. Seriously, you are working through an entire book written by actor/comedian about how to apply the same tools from drama/comedy improv to your business and see how things change and improve. If we would have been teaching and encouraging arts all along, the need would be very different.However, somehow we lost sight of the idea that preparing people for …

Misplaced Weeks

Well, it’s been one of those weeks around here. First this went wrong, then that went wrong.And then Angie’s cat went up a tree and wouldn’t come down. I couldn’t make the 30-40 feet necessary to get her down. So, every time we went outside, we heard her. Wailing. Sad, pitiful, hungry. We were trying to figure out what the best solution was. Naturally, that led to some lousy advice—no, you have never seen a cat skeleton in a tree. That’s true. When they start to get low on nourishment, they have seizures, fall out, and die on the ground. Yes, some things are funny when in normal times and not funny when a child is greatly bothered by what is happening.After all, there’s a time and a place for everything. Face-to-face with a crying child isn’t that place. Anyway, the cat came down. Thanks to a tree service, that is. I greatly appreciated their work. The dumb fuzzball had gotten herself out on a branch she couldn’t get back from. As a result, she needed help.Which, like any good preache…

Sermon Recap for February 12

The best-laid plans of mice and men are usually derailed by cheese. It's been a week that needed to be cheddar, or at least more gouda. I've felt creamed, shredded, grated, and cubed. Anyway, without any further ado, here are the sermon recaps from Sunday.


Here is what you'll find: after each sermon title, there's an "audio" link that allows you to play or download that sermon's audio file. Then there should be an embedded Youtube Link to the sermon.
If you'd like, you can subscribe to the audio feed here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/east-end-baptist-church/id387911457?mt=2 for iTunes users. Other audio feeds go here: http://www.eebcar.com/sermons/feed
The video is linked on the East End Baptist Church web page here: http://www.eebcar.com/sermons-2/ or on my personal Youtube Page here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJBGluSoaJgYn6PbIklwKaw?view_as=public

Thanks!

Morning Sermon: Matthew 22:1-14 (Audio here)



Evening Sermon: Matthew 22:15-16 (audio h…

Painful Obedience: Joshua 5

In Summary: Joshua 5 opens with the people of Israel in the Promised Land. That’s a great start. Even better is the news that the kings of the Amorites and Canaanites are terrified by the work of God in the life of Israel. I like the imagery of Joshua 5:1 of melted hearts and breath taken away. 
Then, things get hairy for Joshua and the Israelites. Apparently, in the 40 years they have wandered in the wilderness, no one has observed the ceremonial rule of circumcision. This is a logical oversight: the wilderness era involved many pack-up and move outs, and there may not have been a healthy way to accomplish the circumcision of newborns. Or, perhaps, the generation that headed off to die in the wilderness (Numbers 14) was rebellious and simply refused. The text does not answer that question, because it is less important the reality. Why the men are uncircumcised is irrelevant. That they are uncircumcised must be addressed.
So, there in the shadows of Jericho, Joshua has flint knives ma…

Book: Interpreting Revelation

One of the only birthday gifts I regret asking for is from the first year I was on Kregel Academic’s review list. They offered my choice of a book or a coffee mug. I took the mug. I like the mug. But their backlist is nice. Ever since then, I’ve taken the book. Someone’s always giving away coffee cups. You can’t get free theology books on the street. (Well, you can, but I don’t think you want them.) Recently, I reviewed Kregel Academic’s Interpreting Apocalyptic Literature by Richard A. Taylor.Today, we have a stand-alone (but companion-esque) volume from C. Marvin Pate, Interpreting Revelation and other Apocalyptic Literature. Taylor’s is more Old Testament focused while Pate’s is New Testament focused. Book was provided as a birthday gift from Kregel Academic. They like me.They really like me :)As with many generations of Christians, it is common for us to struggle with the book of Revelation in the Bible. The first three chapters appear to be easy, then it gets slightly odd for mos…

Sermon Recap for February 5

We continued with our time in Matthew Sunday morning. We’ll be with Matthew through this month. Next Sunday will be Matthew 22:1-14.Morning Sermon: Matthew 18:1-10 (audio)Evening Sermon: Matthew 18 (a brief addendum) and 1 Samuel 17 (audio)

Book: Reach

Somehow, the book choices that I have made in shopping and reviewing lead some folks to ask if I’d like to review books that are far outside my expertise. That’s where this book comes in: Reach by Andy Molinsky. His publicity folks reached out and asked if I wanted it. It’s about business development, primarily, but I thought it would stretch me. So, I accepted a free book in exchange for the review. (Which is the long-standing method of book reviews. Don’t kid yourself that bloggers are selling their opinion. The New York Times review page doesn’t buy many books, either. Never have.)

Actual book review follows:


What does it mean to dwell in an untouched comfort zone? It means never accomplishing beyond the easy items right around us. And that’s not a formula for success at anything. Not in business, not in church work, not in relationships, and not in life. Into this discussion, let us drop Andy Molinsky (Ph.D., Harvard) and his book Reach. This is Molinsky’s second major book, after…

Monday Tools

It’s Monday. Which means it’s time to get back to work and be grateful that the boss isn’t a Patriots or a Falcons fan. Today, I thought I’d peel back a couple of tools that I think are working for me these days.First, in the realm of the printed calendar. Yes, I have seen the future, and it’s printed and bound and the batteries don’t die. That’s a printed calendar. Why? Because there are far too many things that go wrong on the digital one. Do I have enough service? Is my phone responding? Can I get it typed up quickly?In truth: no. No, I cannot. It takes me too long to get the right app open and then enter information. It’s rude to you as you wait for me and wastes both of our time. But I can flip open a paper calendar and it’s all right there. And if I do not have it on me, I have one other notebook on me that I will reconcile when I get back to my calendar.So, what calendar? I have waffled among several calendars, but then came to this conclusion: I have to grab a dated calendar. …

The Week in Review: February 3

Wait, why review the week on Friday?Because in the current rhythm of the Hibbard household, the week starts on Saturday. Which, perhaps, bears some explanation. As a family in ministry, our week looks different much of the time. The way churches work, there are always some folks working on items in the background. Frequently, that involves at least one or two of us. And even when it’s just a “normal” Sunday, we’re in gear the same time as work days and going until later than most normal work days. That’s a separate problem for another day—but too often being a “good church member” gets in the way of people being good neighbors, to say nothing of good friends or family members. (Honestly, is the only time you have to spend with your friends that 4 minutes between Sunday School and church? But we sure do ask for that…) Throw in that most church activities hit on Saturdays—as do most family activities, since we’re busy on Sundays—and “weekends” aren’t great as the opening of our week. Or…

Thursday thoughts

I haven’t put together a coherent blog post for today. Instead, I’ve been doing what I do: try to help people walk better with Jesus. I do it by answering questions and listening. A lot of listening.I have been reading—one of the books I’m working on is Matt Perman’s What’s Best Next. It is, essentially, a productivity book that deals into why a Christian should be productive and what should motivate you in the process. Perman also works into the “how”s of productivity. I’m not there yet.I have been wrestling with the “Why?” questions of productivity. I’m hesitant about things like mission statements or “grand visions” for my life. I also know that the great philosopher Yogi Berra allegedly said, “If you don’t know where you’re going, you’ll wind up somewhere else.”(Yogi also allegedly said that he “didn’t say half the things I’ve said.” For whatever that’s worth.)Perman points people’s perspective toward having a mission statement that everything else filters through. If an item alig…

Book: Interpreting Apocalyptic Literature

Because I am a glutton for punishment, when Kregel Academic offers books, I grab hold of them. Especially when they are on matters far outside my experience base. They provide a book, I learn a good bit, and then you get to read my reactions.First things first on today’s book: Interpreting Apocalyptic Literature by Richard A. Taylor is the next entry in the Handbooks for Old Testament Exegesis series from Kregel Academic. Series editor is David M. Howard, Jr.. Taylor is Senior Professor of Old Testament Studies at Dallas Theological Seminary and the director of their PhD Program. His work demonstrates a breadth of knowledge in the Old Testament and the surrounding world of the times. And, given the doctrinal position of Dallas Theological Seminary, one can see his opening position on Biblical matters. He will approach the text with the view that the Bible portions referred to are nothing less than the Word of God Himself.Now, on to the book. Interpreting Apocalyptic Literature begins …