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Why I'll never get an iPhone, part 2

Ok, so after a good week of bickering with AT&T, they have relented and agreed that honoring customer service commitments is a useful business tool. So, since they did what I said they would have to do for me to stay with them another 2 years, I'm staying with them another 2 years.

So, now, I'll never get an iPhone because: 1.)Apple's going to be paying out big for Steve Wozniak's Dancing with the Stars injuries, and might have to shut down. 2.)by the time I'm done with this contract, the iPhone will be passed by some other amazing widget from Cupertino; 3.)Global Warming/Cooling/Climate Change will eventually destroy all electronics, except for Al Gore's beard hologram generator.

So, AT&T is off my bad side. Pending. But it shows the difference that 1 willing Customer Contact person makes. I had contact with 7 people at AT&T that said I was out of luck. One person went beyond that, and took care of the problem. Train your people to be that 1.

Comments

  1. Glad it got worked out for you. I've been watching this unfold, as my brother works for AT&T - but not in a direct customer service position. He used to manage some of those folks though and it drove him nuts. Seems like for most of them it's their first "real job" and that seems to be a difficult adjustment for many. (I'm trying to be nice.) He's glad to be in a different department now... some kind of project manager.

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  2. I felt like I owed AT&T the same exposure that they had redeemed themselves.

    Usually it really comes back to what the money people push. They so often will not let CS people get adequate training or allow them to do what really should be done, and that's at just about any major company.

    Although, as one of my Facebook friends pointed out, it probably didn't hurt to complain on all of my available outlets. Which is something more companies need to think about. If you get mistreated by a national company, then go blog it, twitter it, or put it on facebook,(or, since all of my stuff is linked, blogging it puts in on twitter and facebook), then you're going to reach a national audience and cause them more trouble.

    So, as always, buyer beware, but this time I'll give AT&T credit for doing right.

    Although I still think I won't get an iPhone, for the above reasons.

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