Skip to main content

Many Leaders

Today, I read Proverbs 28:2 in my morning reading. (I read, usually, the chapter of Proverbs that corresponds with the date, and I rotate translations to keep me from reading to deep of a rut in it.) What is Proverbs 28:2? Well, if the RefTagger is working, all you have to do is hover the link, it'll show. Here it is in ESV:

When a land transgresses, e it has many rulers,
but with a man of understanding and knowledge,
its stability will long continue. Proverbs 28:2 (ESV)

Here it is in NIV:
2 When a country is rebellious, it has many rulers,
but a man of understanding and knowledge maintains order. (Proverbs 28:2 NIV)

Polish:
Dla przestępstwa ziemi wiele bywa książąt jej; ale dla człowieka roztropnego i umiejętnego trwałe bywa państwo (Proverbs 28:2, Gdansk Bible, from multilingualBible.com)

I see the obvious implications here, for our nation, for the nations of the world, that many countries, including our own, do not have stable leadership. We are fractured under many rulers, many princes (NASB), many people to whom we claim allegiances, and our land is falling apart.

But that's not my point today. My point is, how might this apply into the Southern Baptist Convention? Yes, non-SBC readers, I'm on an SBC kick right now. We've got some issues in the house that need cleaned up, and for the handful that listen to me, I'll bring them up. Hopefully have some lighter fare tomorrow, like the return of Random Observations!

How many people claim to speak for Southern Baptists these days? We have voices crying out all over the Convention, many of which seem to be in disagreement.

I think we need to examine rather part of our problem is that we have princes in the first place. The SBC is supposed to be a bottom-up organization. Yet, we have various groups and individuals that want to direct what every church does. It's moving past being 'encouraged' to consider things to a point where we are truly developing a hierarchy as Southern Baptists.

That's not good. We're at a point that we're having to cut missions forces, because of budget issues, yet we're consistently hearing, not encouragement or challenges, but near beatings from nationally prominent SBC leaders that we're all failing, that our churches are useless, and so on.

It's really no wonder we're starting slip. We're being told that we're a failure as churches by this multitude of princes, and we're believing it.

Instead, we need to focus on the second half of that verse:
but with a man of understanding and knowledge, its stability will long continue. We need to focus on a man of understanding. We need to focus on the Lord Jesus Christ.

Doug

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Book Review: The Heart Mender by @andyandrews (Andy Andrews)

The Heart Mender: A Story of Second ChancesEver read a book that you just kind of wish is true?  That's my take on The Heart Mender by Andy Andrews.  It's a charming story of love and forgiveness, and it's woven into the historical setting of World War II America.  For the narrative alone, the book is worth the read, but the message it contains is well worth absorbing as well.However, let's drop back a minute.  This book was originally published under the title Island of Saints.  I read Island of Saints and enjoyed it greatly.  Now, Andrews has released it under a new title, with a few minor changes.  All of this is explained in the Author's Note at the beginning, but should be noted for purchaser's sake.  If you read Island of Saints, you're rereading when you read The Heart Mender.  Now, go ahead and reread it.  It will not hurt you one bit.Overall, the story is well-paced.  There are points where I'd like more detail, both in the history and the geog…

Book: By the Waters of Babylon

Worship. It is what the church does as we strive to honor God with our lips and our lives. And then, many churches argue about worship. I have about a half-dozen books on my shelf about worship, but adding Scott Aniol’s By the Waters of Babylon to the shelf has been excellent.

First of all, Aniol’s work is not based on solving a musical debate. While that branch of worship is often the most troublesome in the local church, By the Waters of Babylon takes a broader view. The starting point is the place of the church. That place is a parallel of Psalm 137, where the people of God, Israel, found themselves in a strange land. The people of God, again, find themselves in a strange land.
Second, in summary, the book works logically to the text of Scripture, primarily Psalm 137 but well-filled with other passages. Then it works outward from how the text addresses the problems submitted in the first chapter into how worship, specifically corporate worship, should look in the 21st century Weste…

Sermon Recap for October 14

Here is what you'll find: there is an audio player with the sermon audios built-in to it, just click to find the one you want. You'll also find the embedded Youtube videos of each sermon.If you'd like, you can subscribe to the audio feed here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/east-end-baptist-church/id387911457?mt=2 for iTunes users. Other audio feeds go here: http://eebcar.libsyn.com/rssThe video is linked on my personal Youtube Page here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJBGluSoaJgYn6PbIklwKaw?view_as=publicSermons are stockpiled here: http://www.doughibbard.com/search/label/SermonsThanks!