Skip to main content

We bought a house

Well, yesterday we signed and reviewed over 90 pages worth of loan and title documents and closed on our house. Why does this matter enough to blog about it?

Because it’s part of life, normal, ordinary life. It’s the next thing on my list of stuff I was never going to do again that I have now gone and done…again.

Why didn’t we want to do it again? Last time we bought a house, the housing market collapsed, we moved, and we couldn’t sell it. In the long run, it took a lot of help and miracle not to go to have it foreclosed on, and I still owe someone for the gift/loan that kept us out of the deep doghouse on it.

And because last time it kept us from being open to the direction God was leading us, and then we went a less-than-good direction from there.

Then there are all the great questions about home ownership: do I know how to fix stuff? Can I afford to fix stuff?

Then, lo and behold, today it looks like a tropical storm is forming. Watch, it will get our house!

But we do what we need to do. For us, one thing we needed to do was make a mental commitment to be here. See, I liked my little country church and relaxed atmosphere. I liked the pace, the situation. And part of me will always miss the sunrise on the prairie, the ducks…but never the mosquitoes. NEVER!

Here, life is different. And here, I’ve been having trouble adjusting to it. It’s noisy. It’s busy. There are more people in my neighborhood than there were in our town. More people in the five mile radius around this church than there were in the whole county.

Seriously, Ann and I did the math the other day and discovered that the population density here is almost 100 times what it was there. Add to that the fear that people won’t like me here and leave church…which they might, truly. I assume there will be a 5-15% decline the first 18 months.

All that makes it easy to grow shallow roots, ready to transplant. Same with renting a house—all you have to do is follow your lease and then move on. Now, though, we’re here.

Stuck. Or committed. However you want to look at it. Some days, it will be more one than the other. But in our minds, we’re now here, committed to be here.

That’s the investment that home ownership is. It’s not that we expect to sell it someday for a profit—far more likely that we’ll barely pay it off someday—but that we have a place that we are attached enough to that we’re legally connected to it.

Does that make it impossible to follow God? Nonsense. It does show, though, that we are going to follow through with where He has put us now, and that we won’t lightly hold to the land we’re responsible for.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Book Review: The Heart Mender by @andyandrews (Andy Andrews)

The Heart Mender: A Story of Second ChancesEver read a book that you just kind of wish is true?  That's my take on The Heart Mender by Andy Andrews.  It's a charming story of love and forgiveness, and it's woven into the historical setting of World War II America.  For the narrative alone, the book is worth the read, but the message it contains is well worth absorbing as well.However, let's drop back a minute.  This book was originally published under the title Island of Saints.  I read Island of Saints and enjoyed it greatly.  Now, Andrews has released it under a new title, with a few minor changes.  All of this is explained in the Author's Note at the beginning, but should be noted for purchaser's sake.  If you read Island of Saints, you're rereading when you read The Heart Mender.  Now, go ahead and reread it.  It will not hurt you one bit.Overall, the story is well-paced.  There are points where I'd like more detail, both in the history and the geog…

Book: The Gospel Call and True Conversion

A quick note: This book, The Gospel Call and True Conversion, is currently available on Kindle for $4.99. This is the second in a series of 3, and the first, The Gospel’s Power and Message, is available for $2.99.The Gospel Call and True Conversion. The title of this book alone sounds intimidating, and adding that it’s written by one of the heavyweights of American Reformed Christianity, Paul Washer, does not lessen the intimidation factor. Washer is known to be a straightforward preacher—for good or for ill.What did I find in The Gospel call and True Conversion? I found some things to like:1. Paul Washer is passionate for the truth. He wants to know the truth. He wants to proclaim the truth. He wants the truth heard. He wants you to know the truth. This is good. It is good to see someone not try to base theology on popularity or as a response to modern events, but to base it clearly on truth. 2. There is a strong emphasis on the reality that true conversion (from the title) will resu…

Sermon Recap for July 29 (and 22)

Good Morning!Here is what you'll find: there is an audio player with the sermon audios built-in to it, just click to find the one you want. You'll also find the embedded Youtube videos of each sermon.If you'd like, you can subscribe to the audio feed here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/east-end-baptist-church/id387911457?mt=2 for iTunes users. Other audio feeds go here: http://eebcar.libsyn.com/rssThe video is linked on my personal Youtube Page here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJBGluSoaJgYn6PbIklwKaw?view_as=publicSermons are stockpiled here: http://www.doughibbard.com/search/label/SermonsThanks!July 29 AM: (Audio)
July 29 PM: (Audio)
July 22 AM: (Audio)July 22 PM: (Audio)