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Book: God in my Everything

First, let me share this book trailer for God in My Everything:

Now, on to the book:

God in My Everything by Ken Shigematsu claims to present a possibility for deeper spirituality even in the busyness of life. It is endorsed by a good number of folks, and echoes the clear screaming many modern people are doing for a clear view of God among the chaos of everyday life.

Shigematu’s overall point in God in My Everything is that the chaos is often of our making, and so to clearly view God, perhaps we should start by clearing the chaos. He works autobiographically through his experience visiting a monastery and working in a major corporation. It’s worth reading, because he does not tread the “look at what I gave up” path and instead highlights the similarities in his ministry vocations throughout the years.

The difficulty with books like God in My Everything is that, too often, the author’s substitute for how you have been living is to live as he says. You need only substitute my exact practices, many seem to say, and all will be well. This is an error that Shigematu diligently avoids. His focus on challenging the reader to think is the true value in this work: Have you considered how you address the Sabbath? rather than a “Thou shalt not fish upon Sunday” viewpoint.

God in My Everything challenges the reader to develop their own personal rule, informed by Scripture and contemplation, regarding each spiritual discipline in the text. Rather than prescribe for each of us, Shigematsu clearly suggests ideas that can be built into a unique pattern for the reader’s life.

There are, naturally, cautions about taking this book and jumping off the mystical deep-end. Christians are anchored by the objective truth of the Word of God and not the fuzzy-feelings inside. However, God in My Everything is well-anchored in that same place.

I really enjoyed this book—more than I expected to. I’m willing to recommend this one. Alongside a solid Bible study, this will make a good group discussion for life.

I did receive a copy of this book for free from Cross Focused Reviews.

Comments

  1. Doug, thank you for your thoughtful review. I am glad you found my book mystical yet anchored in scripture. All the proceeds from the book are going to World Vision and missions.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Pastor Shigematsu, thank you for dropping by. I appreciate your donation of time and effort to World Vision and missions work--I can imagine how much effort a book takes, and to hand over the proceeds is gracious.

    ReplyDelete

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