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A little bloggy update

I've been a bit unfocused in my blogging lately.  Many experts in building a huge blog following recommend that you pick certain topics and stay on them to build up your following.  I've not taken that advice.

I also haven't taken the advice about post length.  Self-promotion, not really, giveaways, not so much, and various other items.  I don't have massively amazing layouts or anything eye-catching.  I don't even bother with paid hosting, hence the "wordpress.com" or "blogger.com" in my web address. Why?

Well, because, as I've recently expressed, I blog as a sideline.  It's a higher sideline than the book I'm writing, which is currently in rough hideous outline format.  However, it's not the be all and end all of my time.  It's a diversion.

And that's ok.  We all need diversions.  If we can develop diversions that help our efforts in life, then so much the better.  I, for one, type better than I ever have since I've been blogging for 2 years.  I try, occasionally, to use this as an opportunity think out loud, sometimes to vent the things that I don't have the chance to say publicly, and to grind my axe about certain issues.

So, quick drive by of those issues:

1.  Can the government actually fix anything?  Should we trust them to fix healthcare? 

2.  Is it odd to anyone else that, now that 2 out of 3 US-based automakers are beholden to President Obama and his political base, Honda and Toyota are now subjects of massive, embarrassing recalls?

3.  In Southern Baptist life, why is it wrong to use percentage given to the Cooperative Program to criticize churches or pastors, but it's okay to use a 50% baseline to criticize state conventions?

4. Why does March Madness not start until the middle of March?  Honestly, could we not have started that last week?

5.  A state district court judge today said "We value liberty over money. Or at least we should."  That was well said.  Unfortunately, we don't live that very well, do we?

6.  I've got jury duty this week.  Last time, I was stricken from the panel by either defense or plantiff, I don't know.  This time, I was peremptory  challenged by either prosecution or defense.  Wondering what will happen tomorrow.  If they don't want me, I can stay home.  Honest.

7.  I've got a book coming from Booksneeze, so you'll see a book review very soon, since it's an easy read short biography.  This is so I can hopefully request a hard-read long biography that I really want.  We'll see.

That's what's going on here.  What's going on where you are?

 

Doug

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