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Sermon Recap for January 25

Good Morning! Here are the sermons from yesterday:

Morning Sermon: Stop Waiting! Mark 1:14-20 (audio)

"Stop Waiting"

Fixed mark: Stop waiting and obey the call of God

On Background:

Mark rapidly shifts from John the Baptist to Jesus—rather than dwelling on the conditions of John’s imprisonment, the ministry of Jesus is picked up immediately.

Notice what happens:

First, Jesus is preaching the Gospel. Nothing positive happens spiritually that God does not initiate!

1. Jesus began ______ the gospel of God (preaching)

God takes the initiative in our salvation—He is the God who seeks and saves.

What is the Gospel?

We all need to be able to make this definition: What is the Gospel? That Jesus, the only-begotten Son of God, lived a sinless life, fulfilled the Law of God, died for sinners, rose up from the dead under His own power, and ascended to Heaven. Because of His substitution, our debt from sin is paid for and God judges us not by our works but by Jesus’ works. This is what is necessary for our salvation.

How should we respond to the Gospel?

2. The response was to repent and believe. Repentance means to ________ and _________ (acknowledge wrong and change behavior)

Repentance involves acknowledging our sin and changing our behavior—and belief is connected to that concept.

We do not believe what we do not act on.

From that point, our belief drives us to follow Jesus. It is not the business of the world, of those who have not believed, to try and follow Jesus. That’s like convincing someone who needs heart surgery to put on a clean shirt for the party.

3. Those who repented and believed were called to _____________Him (follow)

After repentance and belief, though, it is another matter. We are no longer in need of a heart transplant, a brain implant, and resuscitation to life! We are alive.

So we must follow Him—and doing so involves dressing ourselves appropriately (Isaiah 61:10) in the righteousness of life and action, like Christ.

Following as a disciple follows belief and repentance.

Following also should be done without delay:

4. Peter, ________, _________, and John followed ___________ (Andrew, James, immediately)

See what occurs: no delays, no pondering. Action.

5. We must ___________________ and __________ the call of God (stop waiting, obey)

What does that look like?

1. Salvation

2. Baptism

3. Reconciliation with one another

4. Evangelism

5. Commitment of all we have.

Evening Sermon: John 3:16 (audio)

1. God’s love—not our seeking

2. Uniqueness of Jesus

3. Life everlasting

Concluding Notes:

1. I do have the rough audio of Sunday Night’s Q&A session, but I’m not sure yet that it’s useful for posting.

2. I am not sure how to improve video quality with the current equipment.

3. If you want to subscribe, here’s a list:

A. iTunes for audio subscription link is here.

B. General Audio RSS feed for other programs is here.

C. If you’re a Stitcher User, the link is here

D. For Youtube Video, subscribe here:

E. Some videos are up on Vimeo, but budget constraints have ended my posting to Vimeo for the time being.

4. Yes, I think I’m not getting a lot of plays on each service or hits on each blog, but in total it’s a decent reach. A social media expert might suggest changes, but this is free-to-cheap, where I have to live right now.

5. Each blog has a “Follow” button and a “Subscribe via Email” option

6. Follow on Facebook: Doug’s Page or the First Baptist Almyra Page


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