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A few quick questions

1. Did the Occupy Little Rock protest pick this weekend because it's a bye week for the Razorbacks?

2. If we're supposed to acknowledge that the "Occupy" groups are not defined by the radical fruitcakes among them, like the guy in Los Angeles calling for a revolution like the French Revolution, can we apply that to the Tea Party type folks as well? You know, the other batch of ordinary Americans that would like to be left alone by the government and voice their anger? Or does that only apply to this group?

3. Does Michele Bachmann really think people will vote for her when she suggests silly things like flipping over the "9-9-9" of Herman Cain's tax plan to see that it becomes "6-6-6"? There's a decent question or two about the merits of Cain's plan, but really, flip over the numbers?

4. When classifying religious beliefs, you're either a "religion" or a "cult." A "religion" claims to stand on its own two feet. A "cult" claims to be part of a "religion" that doesn't want it. The line is blurry, and the word "cult" gets pretty loaded because of groups like Jim Jones and David Koresh, but that's the use of it. So, a group that claims to be "Christian" or "Muslim" but is not considered to be so by the mainstream of those religions would be labeled a "cult" by the mainstream. So, is Mormonism a cult? If they claim to be a branch of mainstream Christianity, than yes. If they claim to be a different religion altogether, one that has similarities to Christianity but stands on its own, then no. So, ask a Mormon if a Baptist is a Christian that would be acceptable to their religion to balance the rhetoric about Jeffress' statement about Romney. 

Meanwhile, I'd vote against Romney because he's about as liberal as you can be and get past the guard dogs with tinfoil hats at party headquarters. If he gets to the general election, I'll vote for him then---but for now, I'd lean between Cain and…..not sure. Perry annoys me, Bachmann's not much better, and Ron Paul's world doesn't meet reality enough. Who else is left? Especially with me not running…

5. Would it be possible to shorten the campaign season rather than lengthen it? Primaries in the summer, election in the fall, perhaps? It's not like we're really vetting these candidates anyway.

6. Irony: that Occupy Wherever people are using free, corporate paid-for social media to organize and operate their actions. Additional irony: that Tea Party folks use tax-funded streets and police for protection. Although, admittedly, most of us Tea Party types would gladly handle our own protection if the police would let us.

7. Meanwhile, fellow preachers: do we really want to tie our credibility regarding the Gospel, the Word of God, and righteousness to any of these candidates? Or any party? Honestly? A committed Christian who truly lived, voted, and guided the country based on Scripture would have to form a third-party to have a platform. So, can we spend our effort better? From time to time, sure, say something---but put the best of your resources behind spreading the Gospel. After all, we're not about a President anyway. We're all about a King.

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