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Sermon Recap for January 21

Well, first of all, thank you to the East End Water Department for working hard through this afternoon, tonight, and however long it takes to get the water working. It’s not your fault—not sure how anyone could be at fault for a big pipe that deep breaking—so thanks for working on it!

We didn’t have evening service because the water in East End was out. After discussing it with the deacon chairman and hearing the recommendation of the fire department and water department, we felt it was safer and wiser to not have service. Here’s the logic:

1. We are structured around running water for hygiene. Can we leave it at that for “graphic” purposes? And knowing that many folks were in the same no-water situation at home, it seemed prudent not to put them all in one place.

2. The fire department uses water to deal with fires. They do not have a different water source than your home or the church building. They have a crisis plan, but really, is it responsible and neighborly to increase the risk of them needing to use it?

3. At least some of our normal evening folks were headed out to buy bottled water and deal with the issues of home. Knowing you need to take care of family, is it not better to make provision for the time?

That’s what went into the decision.

Here’s the morning sermon: Exodus 20:1-3 (audio link)

Audio player:

Video:

Outline:

January 21 Exodus 20 First Commandment

Passage: Exodus 20:1-3

20 Then God spoke all these words: 2 I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the place of slavery. 3 Do not have other gods besides me.1

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1 Christian Standard Bible (Nashville, TN: Holman Bible Publishers, 2017), Ex 20:1–3.

And the Lord spoke all these words, saying, 2 “I am the Lord your God, who brought out you from the land of Egypt, out of the house of servitude.

3 “⌊You will not have⌋ other gods except me. 1

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1 Rick Brannan et al., eds., The Lexham English Septuagint (Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2012), Ex 20:1–3.

Context:

After the Exodus from Egypt

Before the Promised Land

Hopeful Times

Overview:

The "imperative/future/command" of "You will not--" this is not an option!

"Before/Besides/In My Presence"

Oh, and His presence is *everywhere*

Also note that this is not where the golden calf comes into play.

Reflections:

What are the other gods we have?

Expectations:

THROW OUT YOUR FALSE GODS

False Gods to be Destroyed:

  1. Success
  2. Prowess
  3. Pseudo-spiritual nonsense
  4. Wealth
  5. Pleasures
  6. Influence
  7. Political Capital
  8. Independence
  9. Self-salvation

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