Book: God in Slow Motion

Note: Today’s Book is from Booksneeze.

Mike Nappa. The name means…well, not a whole lot to me. This man is not the flavor-of-the-month Christian author. Neither is he the latest-greatest-most-spectactularest preacher. Instead, he’s a man who has written books and finds other ways to fill his time and buy his groceries. His latest book is titled God in Slow Motion. It’s published by Thomas Nelson Publishers, and runs 206 pages in the paperback.

Let’s dispense with a preliminary complaint about God in Slow Motion: endnotes. I know, it’s not his fault, and I know it’s because of e-books and page formatting for the publisher. So, while I severely dislike endnotes and long for footnotes, I’ll cope. Moving on…

Nappa’s work in God in Slow Motion is inspired by the idea of trying to look behind the normal speed of life and see what God is doing underneath it all. His inspiration, based on the introduction, is the work of Eadweard Muybridge to capture the view of a racehorse in motion. Muybridge’s work showed the reality of a racehorse at gallop: it does leave the ground. Further, it was the basis of this work that led to moving pictures in view.

Nappa, however, is not giving film history. Instead, he is interested in seeing how God is at work underneath, what is going on behind the stories. The views expressed by Nappa are within the bounds of orthodoxy: his Biblical work is fine, though he has not drilled deeply in the academic sense for God in Slow Motion.

The writing style is accessible: Nappa typically writes for a family magazine, so he has the tools to put God in Slow Motion smoothly in front of us. From a Biblical studies perspective, if you are familiar with the major stories of the Bible, you will not find new ground here.

You will find new ways to think about what God is doing from reading God in Slow Motion. I see no reason not to commend this work to you.

Disclosures: I received a copy of this book from Booksneeze in exchange for the review. In all honesty, I probably would have skipped it in the bookstore, but that would have been my life.

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