BookTuesday: Heaven Revealed

Today's BookTuesday selection comes, freely given and freely reviewed, from Moody Publishers. This book, and a copy to be given away to a reader of either my blog or Ann's, were provided in exchange for the review.

What is this book? It's from Paul Enns, and the title is Heaven Revealed. Which you knew from the title of the post-right? Right. Here's a picture with a link to Amazon, in case you'd like to buy this book:

Heaven Revealed: What Is It Like? What Will We Do? . . . And 11 Other Things You've Wondered About

Now, to the question of whether or not you should buy this book. I'll admit that my first reaction to the book's title was wrong. Right now, the publishing world seems to be awash with books about going to heaven and coming back. These books border somewhere between entertaining but questionable to outright nonsense. (Click here to read someone else's review of one of them---I'll be reading that particular book later this month.)

However, Paul Enns is not claiming to be reporting what heaven was like when he dropped in once. He knows people that are there, and he even knows a couple that have seen some things of heaven, and even one who has been there. This book is his effort to help us understand what the people that are there are most likely experiencing, and what those who have seen it said.

Who does he reference that has seen it?

One's name is Isaiah, another's name is John. The one who has been there? His name is Jesus (from Nazareth, thus answering the classic question "Does anything good come from Nazareth?" with a resounding "The only Good does.")

This book is Paul Enns' viewpoint on the Scriptures that discuss what eternity looks like. He works through various passages in the Old and New Testaments, using them to illuminate eternity.

A side note is needed here: he makes clear that his interest is in addressing eternity for believers in Jesus Christ. I found no effort to discuss the end result for unbelievers. This book is not a counterpoint to Rob Bell's Love Wins.

Enns is careful with Scripture, and works to explain his views alongside his personal longings. The book echoes with his longing to be there, to be with her, and to be with Christ. He works through the various questions of heaven: What will we be like? What will we do? Will we know each other?

His answers come through in very comforting language. He sees assurance that we will know each other. That we will not spend all our time sitting on clouds and strumming harps, that we will be useful, fulfilled, and worshipful in all our ways. He traces some of the historical answers to these questions, including referencing the long-running question: "How old will we seem?" (read the book, pg: 131)

In all of this, this book remains one man's understanding of Scripture. While he is, as I said, careful with the text, it's possible that he's not completely accurate.

What of it if he isn't? If he's made errors in his picture of heaven, it's only because heaven will be better. This book will, at the very least, challenge you to rethink heaven, to picture it a little differently than cartoons show it.

All of that will be a good thing.

 

FREE BOOK: Leave a comment either here or at Ann's website, and we'll give away at least one, and maybe two, copies of this book. All comments need to be posted by Sunday, April 10th. Commenting in all places increases your odds of winning….

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