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Book Review: Dug Down Deep by Joshua Harris

If you ever read my Disclosures!, you'll see that I review books for a couple of companies.  One of them is WaterBrook/Multnomah. What have I gotten from them this time?

imageDug Down Deep by Joshua Harris. 

A tendency cycles through the Christian church from time to time to de-emphasize doctrine and focus solely on some of the fluffier themes of Christianity.  Usually it's born out of a combination of many years of doctrinal conflict and a society that is successful in material issues.

I think we live in such a time.  I also think Dug Down Deep is a good book for this time.  Why?

  1. Joshua Harris has some name recognition for his earlier books related to dating and church membership.  I was in college when I Kissed Dating Goodbye came out and made Harris's name well known among my generation.  If most of the people that read Dating will read this one, the church will be much better off, and so will they.
  2. The book is well structured in terms of depth and practicality.  Harris does a good job of explaining why it is important to know the doctrines he presents.  He also does not get down into rabbit trails or esoteric issues.  He also avoids some of the more divisive issues in theology, providing a work that should be non-controversial.  It will, however, whet some people's appetites to chew into controversial issues.  This is good.
  3. Endorsements: the front cover carries an endorsement from Donald Miller, which will draw many emergent folks to this book.  On the back is an endorsement from J.I. Packer, which gives me hope there is real meat for all to find here.  A book that is endorsed by both of these men is hitting towards the middle ground quite well.
  4. Finally, any book that is able to seriously reference Jabba the Hutt as an explanatory image for doctrine and not seem goofy in the process, well, that's just lovely.  Really, that's not a sarcastic comment.  First, Harris is showing an ease in relating culture to theology and doctrine.  Second, I've been a Star Wars fan since I nearly wore out the original VHS release my parents bought. 

 

I'd put this book at 5 stars out of 5.  Very well worth your time.

Doug

Again….free book for the review.

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