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Book: Food, A Love Story

The Book Blitz Continues, but shifts moods!

I am a typical Baptist pastor. I like food. A lot. I remain thoroughly unconvinced that no major problems in this world should not be solved over a good meal together. In fact, I I think an oft-overlooked historical fact is that the most effective summits between the USA and the USSR were the best catered. Most likely with barbecue. (NOTE: “barbecue” is slow-cooked meat, not anything cooked outdoors. Burgers? These are grilled. You cannot barbecue in a hurry.

It is with this strong affection for food that I come to Jim Gaffigan’s second book, Food: A Love Story. Where do I begin, to tell the story of how fun this book can be? A fun food story that he wrote for you and me? Where do I start?

That was unnecessarily musical in my head. Gaffigan, famed for humor about whales, blubber, Hot Pockets, and childbirth, gives us his second effort at a book length masterpiece. It is certainly piece of something, whether or not it’s masterful is going to come down to your opinion.

First, there is no unification of theme other than “food.” If you were expecting a great tome on world hunger problems, you are in the wrong place. But if you want some wandering thoughts about our strange approach to food as Americans, this is the right place.

Second, there is no heavy attention span investment needed here. Gaffigan has politely fed us this book in reasonable courses, rather than just dropping a whole roast on the table and expecting us to sort it ourselves. The chapters/essays range from a few pages to just a few more pages. Easy to read, easy to digest.

Third, there is no emotional investment necessary here. You might look at the cover picture and wonder if Gaffigan and the hot dog actually get together or not—but you know from the first few pages they do. And the hot dog is still hanging around—both with Gaffigan and with a few dozen of its family members.

Is this a life-changing book?

For the love of bacon, no.

It is a funny book, and one worth letting the stress of today’s world melt a bit off of you to read.

I did receive a copy of this book in exchange for the review. That’s the way book reviewing works.

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