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A few randoms for Wednesday

I should have some coherent thoughts, but I don’t. Instead, I’ll share a few random ones:

1. I love that my wife works at home. (She works for Home Educating Family). She actually works, so it’s helped me learn to work at home. Used to be, I’d “work at home” and cram a day of work into two. Now I actually get stuff done. It’s nifty.

2. I remember watching TV series as a child and being sad when they ended their run. I still remember Judge Harry Stone leaving the Night Court, Sam turning off the lights at Cheers, and Cliff and Claire dancing off the Cosby Show. Now I binge watch via Netflix DVDs, and wonder if it would be better for Rick and Kate to retire so I can just watch the whole series in sequence. 

In other words: I’m not a fan of waiting for next season. 

3. There is a line between being passionate for the truth and being a rabid pain in the backside. Be the former, not the latter.

4. If you have no sense of humor, you’ll live longer. Or at least, it’ll seem longer because you’ll be miserable. And it will make other people’s lives seem longer, too. Cheer up.

5. As a counterpoint to that thought, it’s a challenge to be cheerful in a highly-connected world. After all, I always know of someone in crisis or a world tragedy. ALWAYS. Am I disrespecting a loss by carrying on? No…but I don’t carry on nonsensically directly in front of those dealing with tragedy.
And no, generic Facebook doesn’t count as directly in front of you. About anything. 

6. That being said: no, my Facebook post isn’t rubbing your face in my religion or my politics. Neither is yours, unless you tag me in it. Or post it on my wall. That’s annoying—but otherwise, do what I do: speed scroll past the morons. Yes, you may speed-scroll past me and and me past you, and so we’re both morons. Get over it.

7. School year is about to start. Which means it’s time for: The public school folks to lay guilt on the homeschoolers, the homeschoolers to lay guilt on the public schoolers, the private school people to act all super-duper for their private school, and the rest of us to dump on them.

Or we could all pray for and encourage each other rather than pounce on those who walk differently than we do. Yes, you will hear more from me about homeschool encouragement and methods than the other two. Why? BECAUSE I HOMESCHOOL. It’s the community I dwell in, and what I know. It would seem somewhat pretentious for me to post a “public school tip” every week when I’m not involved. I will post general ideas about learning that I think benefit everyone…but really, let’s learn to back off and let people do what they think they need to do.

8. Some people hate blogging and complain about bloggers. I’ve seen them do this on their blogs. Or in their books, which they got published without any real error-check or anything because of political or religious connections—but they rail against “unreliable bloggers” in their unreliable books. 

9. I’m amazed at how much stuff I print from my paperless work flow.

10. There’s a rabbit on my desk. Fortunately, he’s stuffed, but adjusting his ears does not improve my Wi-Fi reception.

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