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Sermon Wrap-up from February 9

Due to weather uncertainty, especially for Pastor Desmuke coming from Little Rock, we are rescheduling our worship gathering with Providence Missionary Baptist Church. I hope that rescheduling may help us move toward more than annual gatherings.

Morning Sermon: Free to Worship, Serve, and Praise

Free to Worship, Serve, and Praise: Exodus 12 from Doug Hibbard on Vimeo.

Evening Sermon: Psalm 90  Microsermon

We had such an extended Questions/Answers time on Exodus that I sheared off the sermon to 2 minutes.

Psalm 90 MicroSermon from Doug Hibbard on Vimeo.

Morning Outline:

Free to Worship, Serve, and Praise


1.1. Exodus

We are looking specifically at Exodus 12:33-38; 12:51

1.2. Proposition

Our freedom in Christ is to worship, serve, and praise God Almighty in all our lives

1.3. Intro: Basis of Captivity

Food. It's always about our basic desires and wants.

Survival, choices we think we have to make.

Heritage, where we have come from.

Inside, the attitudes and habits we cultivate within ourselves

Outside, those who do not know us or our Lord Jesus.

1.4. Freedom

Enslaved to sin--trapped, unable to be free

Slavery to sin is something that we cannot escape on our own;

Slavery, often in ancient times, had to do with debt. You were a slave until you paid your debt.

Slavery to sin is ended only at death--we are slaves for life, because we never stop sinning and so never pay off our debt.

Death alone frees us--then we get our wages--slaves that satisfied their debt were paid wages.

Or given gifts.

I assure you, you will never want what you have earned. (Romans!)

1.5. Worship, serve, and Praise

Worship: acknowledging the sacrifice that Jesus made for us; meeting His sacrifice with our own (Romans 12) Worship is the adoration of God, fully with all we have.

We see worship in the Passover lamb

We see worship in the family gathering to eat the Passover lamb--there should be no "alone" in the Kingdom!

We see worship in surrendering, preparing, and obeying

Service: putting your shoulder to the load and moving it. Saddling up the donkeys and camels. Packing, moving

Praise: voicing our commitment and appreciation; our amazement and stand for God

Note that nowhere, no matter how desperate the situation became, were God's people sent out to fight--not yet, at least.

Our first priority is worship, service, and praise. The Lord God will deliver us.

Where does your energy go?

1.6. In all our lives

Adults, children, aged and inexperienced

From beginning to end--the deliverance from slavery in Egypt was for life--no going back!

1.7. Conclusion

1. Salvation: you cannot if you are not free--so come to the Cross for Freedom?

2. Action points: are you fighting when you should be praising? Are you watching the pursuing armies and not the leading cloud of glory?

3. Specific Follow-up point: there are barriers in our lives that we have built not heeding the "mixed multitude" (Exodus 12:38) that go up with us. Tear down those barriers, and let God allocate us as tribes! Let us be who we ought to be!

4. Worship, serve, and praise. Stop holding back!

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