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Wednesday Wanderings: October 16

In case you want the audio for the sermons for this week, it’s here:

Now, on to your regularly scheduled Wednesday wanderings.

The Gospel Project materials we are using skip from Joshua 24 to Judges 3. This means we skip Judges 1 and 2, so if you want some of what I have to say about that, here it is: http://www.doughibbard.com/2013/09/sermon-wrap-up-for-september-15.html

I also recently preached Judges 3, and it’s here: http://www.doughibbard.com/2013/09/sermon-wrap-up-for-september-22.html

On to the material. First of all, the material for the kids includes a video-based presentation of the Biblical passage. I do not understand why Lifeway skipped portraying Ehud as left-handed. They have him stab Eglon with his right hand. That’s wrong.

More important information abounds, though. It is this: God used people, and still uses people, to accomplish His purposes.

Those purposes can be positive or negative in the short-term. For example, the oppressors of Israel are being used for God’s purposes. It is painful in the short-term and positive in the long-term. Why? Because it brings repentance.

The judges are part of that work. They are used by God to bring about repentance, even if only for a short time.

What else?

I wonder if the judges knew they were “The Judges” or if they just did what was necessary? I’m reminded of a Star Trek line about not trying to be great. Just do what you can, and let history determine greatness. Or something like that. It’s in First Contact.

I wonder how the Israelites lost Jerusalem, which they captured in Judges 1 but David has to recapture in 2 Samuel.

I also wonder what Adoni-Bezek’s real name was, since Adoni-Bezek basically means “lord/king of Bezek.”

The incident in Judges 2 with the Angel of YHWH is interesting, as it highlights the whole problem. We do not eliminate sin completely, and then it sticks around. That’s a problem, and it persists.

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