BookTuesday: Creating your Personal Life Plan

Yep, it's a long title.

No, it's not a sponsored book review. From time to time, when I'm caught up on book reviews that I get free books for, I'm going to review other books that I've found useful. While I won't do a lot of the books I read, I'll do a few of the more practical or impactful books.

Why won't I do all of them? Do you really want to read a review of The Venerable Bede, The World of Bede, Parochial Vision: The Future of the English Parish, Roman Britain and Early England: 55 B.C. –A.D. 871? I didn't think so.

Today I want to point you to an e-book that I got, well, yesterday. It's from Michael Hyatt, the CEO of Thomas Nelson Publishers. He titled this book Creating Your Personal Life Plan. I'd like to tell you about it, then tell you how to get it.

First of all, this is not a big book. The overall e-document (in PDF format) is 93 pages. That means, if you are so inclined, you can print it out front and back and use 47 pages. You can print a 2-on-1 page with some printers and cut that in half again. Printing it out will give you the opportunity to make a lot of notes.

Which you'll probably need. This book spends a few pages explaining the need for a "Life plan" and then tells you how to make one. Without stealing Hyatt's thunder, most of us need one. The rest of you who don't need one, will eventually.

The purpose is to have a target that you're aiming at with life, not just day by day, but week by week and month by month. After all, as the great philosopher Yogi Berra is quoted "If you don't know where you're going, you'll wind up someplace else."

So, the first parts help establish the need of a Life Plan. The rest? They're a walk, step-by-step, through how Hyatt created his and how he maintains it. The first temptation will be "I can do this myself without help." Take a look anyway. I can cook from random ingredients, but I learned by cooking with someone who taught me how.

The book started off as a blog post or two, and then the thoughts and ideas were expanded into this book. Some of this book consists of the more well-known motivational quotes. Due to their familiarity, they lack the punch of the newer material. All in all, this book is worth the effort to get it and work through it.

I'd highly recommend you click over to Michael Hyatt's blog at this link. There's information on that post about getting the book for free. What will you have to do? Sign up to receive his blog via email. If you're involved in leadership or management, it won't hurt you anyway.

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